A Funky Conversation With The Pimps Of Joytime On Music, Brooklyn & More

first_imgThe Pimps of Joytime have found an audience thirsty for their brand of New Orleans-infused funk well beyond the bounds of their Brooklyn roots.They’ve already been busy on the festival circuit. This spring, they’ve taken their tunes to JazzFest down south and Lightning in a Bottle and BottleRock out West. Later this summer, you’ll find the Pimps promoting their new album, Jukestone Paradise, at the Deaf Camp Benefit in Snowmass Village, Colorado on July 16 and FloydFest in Floyd, Virginia on July 27, in addition to a slew of other dates in Washington, D.C., Colorado, New Jersey and Pennsylvania along the way.Live For Live Music had a chance to catch up with three of the pimps—lead singer and guitarist Brian J, percussionist and vocalist Mayteana Morales and vocalist Kim Dawson — before their set at BottleRock in Napa, California to talk about the band’s origins, how they fuse different styles together, the challenges of making money in music today and more!L4LM: Where did the name “Pimps of Joytime” come from?Brian J: When I was making my first record, I hit up a friend of mine to write a little piece, a little spoken-word piece, for this track. On some of the stuff they wrote was “Pimp of Joytime”. When I saw it, I just figured “That’s the name of the band.”L4LM: That was how long ago?Brian J: Ten years ago.L4LM: In those 10 years, do you feel the name has adapted well to you or that you have adapted well to the name? Does it fit? Has it fit you well?Brian: Well, I think we all have a different answer. My answer is yes, for the most part. People see the name and they’re like “Ooh, that sounds fun.” Here and there, some people can be offended about it, or if it’s some type of government-sponsored gig, it could potentially rub certain people the wrong way with that. But I’ve enjoyed it.L4LM: How did you all come together?Brian: Well, it’s an evolving…it’s evolved. It started as one thing and, over the years…I started working with May within the first year of the band. And then Dave [David Bailis, on the bass, keys and sampler], maybe six years, five years ago. Dave, maybe even six years. Then John [Staten, the drummer], maybe four years and Kim…Kim Dawson: This is my one-year anniversary this weekend.L4LM: Congratulations!Kim: My first gig with the band was Memorial Day weekend last year. Let’s get some more wine!L4LM: I guess that’s sort of the industry, to have to bring in new members.Kim: It’s very common for bands that have been around for 10 years, 10-plus years, to have evolutions, different rotations of members. Sometimes, people come back. Sometimes…you know. Everybody’s trying to do what’s best for the band. Everybody’s trying to do what’s best for themselves as individual musicians. But I feel like everybody right now in Pimps of Joytime is pretty happy with what we have. The sound is good, we get along.L4LM: Good chemistry.Kim: Yeah, it’s good chemistry, for sure. And especially because we all come from kind of different backgrounds as far as our musical education and professional experiences in music, whether it’s gospel for some of us or it’s like Afrobeat for some of us, whether it’s rock for some. I think that contributes to the sound because we all bring a little bit of that.Mayteana: Well, the music itself, it already started as a really diverse sound, so for us to come from those different backgrounds, we all found a place. I love all kinds of music and I think everyone in the band does. It works for all of us in terms of taste, too. I think we do find joy in being able to play such diverse kinds of music.L4LM: Do you feel like it’s more common nowadays for bands to be more eclectic in the way they bring together all different types of music? Or is it almost less genre-defined now than it used to be?Mayteana: I think it depends on what kind of scene you’re in. I think in the jam band scene there definitely is more variety in one set, you know, just because everybody has different influences.Kim: I think the industry, too, has changed. There is more acceptance in the mainstream if you have…it’d be like, “Okay, this is rock and this is what our definition of rock is and that’s all we play.” But I don’t think it’s ever been true that musicians have only been interested in or been influenced by one style of music. I don’t care who you are, whether you’re the Rolling Stones or whoever. I think everybody always has lots of things they listen to, and now I think in the industry, change is more common to be allowing all of these different sounds into your overall sound.L4LM: How do you guys go about incorporating so many different musical elements into one cohesive whole? What I’m asking about the songwriting process more than anything, more than anything.Brian: It happens really naturally and organically. I even have to try to be disciplined to make it a little…it can be too crazy sometimes. You’ve got to keep it focused. That’s always been a challenge for me is, it’s great to have a lot of influences, but you always want it to be cohesive. So that’s sort of been the challenge.Mayteana: Yeah, I remember when you wanted to incorporate polka and it just got vetoed.Kim: Everyone’s like, “Nope!”Brian: It was too much, that waltz base.Mayteana: Little polka dots.L4LM: What’s the genre of music that you were able to incorporate that most surprised you by the extent to which it worked?Brian: Well, I think in putting the original, first record together, I was experimenting like wildly with different styles. The funk groove, the foundation being groove sort of rose to the top as like, “This seems fun” when I was thinking about what kind of show do I really want to play? I decided to make it fun.L4LM: And you guys have ridden that since then, more or less?Brian: Yeah, yeah. I mean, it’s gone a little more rock, a little more blues. But certainly the heavy, rhythmic influence, like the really groove foundation thing, has really stayed.Mayteana: I don’t think there’s ever been a genre you’ve drawn from that has been so left field and it ended up working. I think everything that you’ve pulled from, it just naturally fit in, you know what I mean?Brian: That sounds good.L4LM: How do you feel you guys fit into the festival atmosphere? Because this is a pretty eclectic environment to be in, with so many different artists coming through. Do you feel at home in an atmosphere like this?Brian: I do, yeah. It’s just, you’re getting people where they’re really receptive. They want to have fun, and it’s like, “Oh, this is our perfect audience person.” They’re like out, they’re like “I want to have fun!” And we’re like, “WE want to have fun!” It’s a perfect combination.L4LM: I’m sure you guys have had some gigs where the crowd hasn’t been all that receptive, maybe the mood has been more tense.Brian: We’re familiar with it, yeah.Kim: I think most musicians have that, I don’t care what level you’re at even. Sometimes, you’re like, “Okay cool. Here’s where we are. I see. Cool.” It’s just part of the job.L4LM: What do you take away from experiences like that?Brian: Well, you have to work harder. That’s when it’s like, you keep working, you don’t give up. I’m really into comedy. It’s like these comedians. They have to keep working and finding a way to loosen up the crowd and get them laughing. That’s essentially what we do, but on a musical dance level.L4LM: It’s almost like finding your voice as a band, like you have to find something you can connect with audience on a certain level. They can get you, they can feel you.Brian: Well, we have a lot of built-in devices in our set, like things that’s like, “Okay, this works on people.” Sometimes, it works better than others.L4LM: Any examples of what those are?Brian: Arrangement things, vocal…just pretty much what we do. We construct a moment, like “Okay, we’re going to build this up and then we’re going to break it down.” When it works, people get really excited.Mayteana: It can be really challenging to play for an audience that’s very mellow. So, in those situaitons, it can be easy to not give as much energy back, as a show where an audience is going nuts. So I think the important, at least personally, I try to refmember to connect to the music and go from there, because that’s first and foremost. You can’t go off of someone sitting there watching you with a serious face, you know? It’s just like, “Hey [clap], I’m going to do this anyway!”Brian: That’s a good answer.Kim: You can’t get psyched out by whatever their mood is, if you’re feeling ready to party and they’re like “I’m chilling.”L4LM: You’ve got to hope they come along with you.Kim: Well, you just do what you do regardless.Mayteana: 100 percent.Kim: You have to do what you have to do and mean it and be authentic, authentically yourself. And eventually, people respond to that. People respond to when you are authentic. I think that, like you said, we connect to the music and we connect with each other and we’re just ourselves.Brian: But that’s a real challenge. Like, if you’re there and the audience, they’re just like dull. Sometimes we have gigs like that where like, for me, I’ll really connect to the music and I just completely don’t give a fuck. I’m having a great time, my eyes are closed, I’m just going for it. But then, when you don’t connect, you’re really having trouble connecting musically for the sound or your mood or whatever, those are the most challenging nights.Kim: Like you said, it’s work. You’re working harder. Not that we don’t ever, you know, put ourselves out there. It’s just like, there’s definitely a different energy level when you’re having to be like, “Okay! I’m going to make you dance!”L4LM: You have to give them more energy for them to then reciprocate.Kim: Yeah, and that’s always the balance that you’re working with on stage, reciprocating energy and then your own energy. It’s like this dance that you’re doing the whole time with the audience. But…Brian: I hope you’re not going to write this whole answer, the longest fucking answer to one question ever.Kim: It’s like 20 minutes.L4LM: It’s interesting to me! I don’t care.Brian: “This article is about what happens when the crowd isn’t feeling it and you’ve got to try to make it happen.”L4LM: I think it’s interesting, though, because jam music is so crowd-oriented.Brian: Well, we’re not actually a jam band.Kim: Yeah.L4LM: But you do jam sometimes.Brian: We do some jamming, but we write songs and we sing and we have harmonies and structure.Mayteana: It’s pretty structured. We have cues and a lot of sections.Kim: I would say…you mean like when we’re with crowds that are more of the jam orientation, festivals that are more jam-oriented.L4LM: Is it important at some level to read a crowd? Do you try to read a crowd?Brian: I think there’s a combination. You read them. Dave makes the set lists. That does structure the energy flow of the set. You read them, but I think regardless, you’re just going to put a lot of energy out there.Mayteana: I think it can go too far either way. You can’t go by just what the audience is feeling because we also have this thing we do. There’s a balance.L4LM: You guys are Brooklyn-based. Are any of you from Brooklyn? Did you meet in Brooklyn?Brian: Well, I met May in Brooklyn during the genesis, the early genesis of the band. And Dave also is from Brooklyn. And then I imported Kim and John from out of state.Kim: We were the imports, yes.L4LM: Where were you imported from?Kim: I’m imported from Denver. John is imported from San Diego.L4LM: Do any of you live in Brooklyn?Kim: May, Brian and Dave do.L4LM: A lot of our fans have noticed a rise in the live music culture of Brooklyn. Can you speak to that at all?Brian: I think May’s more qualified because she actually gigs in Brooklyn. The Pimps only play about three or four shows a year there because we’ve graduated to a certain level. You have an experience with it.Mayteana: I was just talking about this with my husband the other day and we were talking about how, for a while—you can attest to this too—is that the live music scene was dying for a short time. And now I’m walking around and I see live music here, live music there. It’s kind of resurging a bit, which is really nice to see because it was like, “What is happening to this culture?” It was kind of disappearing. These great music venues are shutting down with high rents or whatever. And now, so, me and my man, we play these restaurants and we’re playing 1920s, 30s music. So people are connecting to some rootsy music. I think there is the desire for live music and for music that’s not only popular, but all kinds of music. I think it’s an important part of the city. But there’s always a venue—Rockwood, for instance, Lower East Side—there’s always something interesting to see, so I think you just have to find different pockets. I don’t know. I think it’s always, it’s ever changing and the styles are ever changing, you know? There’s modern, there’s old, there’s people that are going to music school, there’s crazy…I don’t know if you know Cory Henry, Funk Apostles and Snarky Puppy, that school, that are playing some crazy new shit. It’s interesting. I think there is an evolution.L4LM: That seems to be the case with live music in general. Last year was a banner year in the business. It’s harder to make money just by recording music so you have to go out and play. Have you guys experienced that first-hand?Brian: Oh yeah. You can barely make anything making albums anymore. But the one thing there’s always going to be a value for is live music. So think as music just becomes so available, and I think in some ways people fall in love with albums less than they used to because it used to be, you got the vinyl or the tape and you just look at the picture on it and put this in. Where now, it’s just like, “Oh, what do I want to listen to now?” You can access anything. Maybe that means less and maybe that has some type of effect on making live music.L4LM: Along those lines, where do you guys fall as far as streaming is concerned? I was listening to you guys through Spotify…Brian: Yeah, Spotify is a real problem for artists. It’s a problem that they need to figure out. It’s not fair for artists. It’s incredibly…it’s not really moral. I use Spotify too, but they just need to figure out a way that they are not taking advantage of artists, that they can compensate the artists. Making records is really expensive and time consuming and it’s like your life’s work and then people just…the company…I think you saw the thing that was going around on Facebook. You need to get like, what, 200 million plays to equal the average salary. They just need to figure something out.Mayteana: And I think, at this point, they have like membership fees that will cover a little bit more for artists.Brian: Or you get 10 plays and then you have to buy the record or something like that.Kim: Something. There’s got to be a way. And the thing is, artists will start getting fed up enough that they have to find a way. I understand on the other side, the consumer side. We all use it, I’m sure, Spotify. It’s great to have the access, but we’re also, this is our living. We’ve put so much into it.L4LM: Well thanks so much for talking to us!Note: Parts of this interview were edited for clarity and length. Photo taken by Stuart Levine at BottleRock.last_img read more

3-D material changes shape as it prepares for next task

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maKILHxcGAE” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/maKILHxcGAE/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Imagine a house that could fit in a backpack or a wall that could become a window with the flick of a switch.Harvard researchers have designed a new type of foldable material that is versatile, tunable, and self-actuated. It can change size, volume, and shape; it can fold flat to withstand the weight of an elephant without breaking, and pop right back up to prepare for the next task.The research was led by Katia Bertoldi, the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS); James Weaver, senior research scientist at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University; and Chuck Hoberman of the Graduate School of Design. It is described in Nature Communications.“We’ve designed a 3-D, thin-walled structure that can be used to make foldable and reprogrammable objects of arbitrary architecture, whose shape, volume, and stiffness can be dramatically altered and continuously tuned and controlled,” said Johannes T.B. Overvelde, a graduate student in Bertoldi’s lab and first author of the paper.Foldable material Harvard researchers have designed a new type of foldable material that is versatile, tunable and self actuated. It can change size, volume and shape; it can fold flat to withstand the weight of an elephant without breaking, and pop right back up to prepare for the next task. Credit: Johannes Overvelde/Bertoldi Lab/Harvard SEAScenter_img A foldable and reprogrammable material made up of individual cells whose shape, volume, and stiffness can be dramatically altered and continuously tuned and controlled. Johannes Overvelde/Bertoldi Lab/Harvard SEASThe structure is inspired by an origami technique called snapology, and is made from extruded cubes with 24 faces and 36 edges. Like origami, the cube can be folded along its edges to change shape. The team demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally by a centimeter-scale prototype, that the cube can be deformed into many different shapes by folding certain edges, which act like hinges. The team embedded pneumatic actuators into the structure, which can be programmed to deform specific hinges, changing the cube’s shapes and size, and removing the need for external input.The team connected 64 of these individual cells to create a 4-by-4-by-4 cube that can grow, and shrink, change its shape globally, change the orientation of its microstructure, and fold completely flat. As the structure changes shape, it also changes stiffness — meaning one could make a material that’s very pliable or very stiff using the same design. These actuated changes in material properties add a fourth dimension to the material. “We do not only understand how the material deforms, but also have an actuation approach that harnesses this understanding,” said Bertoldi. “We know exactly what we need to actuate in order to get the shape we want.”The material can be embedded with any kind of actuator, including thermal, dielectric, or even water.“The opportunities to move all of the control systems onboard combined with new actuation systems already being developed for similar origami-like structures really opens up the design space for these easily deployable transformable structures,” said Weaver.“This structural system has fascinating implications for dynamic architecture, including portable shelters, adaptive building facades, and retractable roofs,” said Hoberman. “Whereas current approaches to these applications rely on standard mechanics, this technology offers unique advantages such as how it integrates surface and structure, its inherent simplicity of manufacture, and its ability to fold flat.”“This research demonstrates a new class of foldable materials that is also completely scalable,” Overvelde said, “It works from the nanoscale to the meter-scale and could be used to make anything from surgical stents to portable pop-up domes for disaster relief.”This paper was coauthored by Twan A. de Jong, Yanina Shevchenko, Sergio A. Becerra, and George Whitesides. The research was supported by the Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers, the National Science Foundation and the Wyss institute through the Seed Grant Program.A 3-D Material that Folds, Bends and Shrinks on its Ownlast_img read more

COVID-19 Quarantines Increase In Chautauqua County, Two New Positive Cases Reported Sunday

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE – The number of those under quarantine or isolation orders in Chautauqua County increased this weekend.The County Health Department reported Sunday 516 are now under quarantine, up 88 from 428 Saturday.Additionally, two new confirmed cases of COVID-19 were reported, bringing the countywide total to 176, with 36 active.The new cases involve a child and a woman in her 70s. There remain zero people hospitalized with COVID-19 in Chautauqua County.Since the outbreak began, 133 people have recovered from COVID-19, with 7 deaths and 18,005 negative test results reported.last_img

Cooler Sunday Proceeds A Early Week Warm-Up

first_imgImage courtesy East Lakewood Weather.JAMESTOWN – The back half of the weekend will be dry and seasonable, before a gradual warm-up begins on Labor Day.A beautiful Sunday is in store. Partly Cloudy with highs in the low to mid-70’s.For tonight, a warm front will slowly approach the area that may touch off a shower or two, otherwise it will be partly cloudy with lows around 60.A system passing by to the north will slowly pass by the region early on in the new week. A warm front will stall out over the area Monday afternoon that will provide for a chance for a few showers or storms on Labor Day, otherwise it will be partly cloudy. Temperatures will range greatly tomorrow depending on if we lie in the warmer or cooler sector of the front. Southeast of the front temperatures will reach the lower-80’s while the cooler section of the front will be in the lower to mid-70’s. As the warm front pushes through the area on Monday night into Tuesday, temperatures to reach the lower-80’s for mid-week with moderate humidity. Temperatures will reach their peak on Wednesday with highs in the mid-80’s. Both days will see sunshine with a chance for a shower.The forecast gets more difficult for later in the week, that will be more determined as the week progresses.WNYNewsNow is a proud Ambassador for the NOAA Weather-Ready Nation program. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Editorial: The Trump Administration’s Fake Grid-Resiliency Plan

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Scranton (Pa.) Times-Tribune:Energy Secretary Rick Perry claims his plan to further subsidize the failing coal and nuclear power industries is crucial to improving the electrical power grid.The grid itself disagrees.PJM Interconnection, which operates the massive power grid covering 13 states, including Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia, has told the Department of Energy that the subsidy plan is “unworkable.”Perry wants to require utilities to compensate power generators that maintain 90-day stockpiles of coal or nuclear fuel, ostensibly to shore up the grid during protracted periods of cold or hot weather. It is a transparent payback to those industries for their political support last year of President Donald Trump.Power generation isn’t the issue regarding the grid. More than 40 new gas-fueled power plants are planned or under construction in Pennsylvania alone. The supposedly free-market administration would skew the market in favor of coal by regulation.According to PJM, doing so would drive up power costs throughout its region. And a large bipartisan group of former commissioners of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the ultimate grid regulator, told the DOE that the plan would not only increase power prices but dry up investment in new, cleaner, more efficient power plants.The plan isn’t about shoring up the grid. It’s about shoring up Trump’s political base. The DOE should abandon it.Perry refuted Editorial: The Trump Administration’s Fake Grid-Resiliency Planlast_img read more

U.K.’s largest subsidy-free solar farm begins commercial operation

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renewables Now:NextEnergy Solar Fund Ltd on Monday said it has brought online a 50-MWp solar installation, which is the biggest subsidy-free solar park in the UK.The Staughton solar farm, located on the Bedfordshire/Cambridgeshire border in England, produces enough power to cover the needs of about 15,000 households. This is the second subsidy-free solar system switched on by NESF this year, after it completed the 5.4-MWp Hall Farm II in Leicestershire in August. The company’s portfolio of operating solar assets has reached a total capacity of 755 MWp.The company also said that the site of its next subsidy-free solar park, High Garrett, is being prepared for construction. It will be an 8.5-MWp extension to the 5-MW Kentishes solar park in Essex, which sells electricity under the Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROC) scheme in the UK and was acquired by NESF in 2016. The new system is due to be completed in the first half of 2020.NESF plans to add UK subsidy-free assets with a total capacity of about 150 MWp to its portfolio, including 55.4 MWp that are already delivered.[Aleksandra Dimitrova]More: NESF switches on 50-MWp subsidy-free solar farm in UK U.K.’s largest subsidy-free solar farm begins commercial operationlast_img read more

Governor Wolf Announces New Manufacturing Apprenticeship Opportunities in Bucks County

first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces New Manufacturing Apprenticeship Opportunities in Bucks County SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Jobs That Pay, Press Release, Workforce Development Governor Tom Wolf announced the approval of $200,000 in new funding for Bucks County Community College’s (BCCC) apprenticeship program. The funding will build on the governor’s commitment to expanding job training opportunities in Pennsylvania.“This funding will enable Bucks County Community College to offer fully-encompassed training to individuals looking for good-paying jobs,” said Gov. Wolf. “By supporting apprenticeship programs, we’re strengthening Pennsylvania’s workforce and helping manufacturing companies secure fully-trained, long-term workers.”The funding will assist with the training of students for the Metalwork Pre-Apprenticeship Training Program through the creation of an awareness campaign to increase recruitment for all BCCC Manufacturing Pre-Apprenticeship Training Programs. BCCC will run a campaign to educate Bucks County residents about the free, 12-week, Pre-Apprenticeship Training Program that upskills and retains unemployed and underemployed individuals, many of whom may face barriers to employment as identified by the Workforce Investment Opportunity Act (WIOA). The training also includes soft skills training, job shadowing opportunities, and individualized job placement assistance with partnering manufacturing employers. After finishing the Metalwork Pre-Apprenticeship Training Program, apprentices have completed 288 hours of training and received certifications in OSHA10, forklift safety, National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NMS), Certification Exam for Measurement, Materials, and Safety Level I.“We are thrilled to receive this funding, and we are thankful to Governor Wolf and the Department of Community and Economic Development for committing resources to the workforce needs in our community,” said Executive Director of the Center for Workforce Development at Bucks County Community College Susan Herring. “The Training to Career Grant will allow us to make students, parents, and job seekers aware of these free training programs which provide life-changing opportunities and high-paying careers in manufacturing.”Apprenticeships are a key component of Governor Wolf’s PAsmart initiative, an innovative way to improve coordination between state agencies, cut red tape, and invest in people and businesses to expand innovative job training in apprenticeships and other programs so workers get the skills they need to compete in the global economy.Governor Wolf’s Manufacturing PA initiative was launched in October 2017, and since then has funded 35 projects and invested more than $9 million through the Training-to-Career program. Training-to-Career grants support projects that result in short-term work-readiness, job placement, or the advancement of manufacturing. The Manufacturing PA Training-to-Career program works collaboratively with local manufacturers to identify and teach missing essential skills for entry level applicants seeking manufacturing employment, engage youth or those with barriers to career opportunities in manufacturing, and advance capacity for local or regional manufacturers.For more information about the Wolf Administration’s commitment to workforce training, visit the Department of Community and Economic Development website, and be sure to stay up-to-date with all of our agency news on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.center_img January 14, 2020last_img read more

Alan Curtis doing his homework on prospective Swansea boss Marcelo Bielsa

first_img “As I said last week, the important thing is that we get the right man in,” Curtis said. “If that takes a little bit longer then so be it because we are prepared to carry on for as long as possible. “But it’s probably best for everybody that the new man is appointed sooner rather than later. “A new manager could come in next week, but if no-one presents themselves we’ll carry on for the West Brom game and possibly thereafter. “But it could change so quickly.” Swansea will find themselves in the bottom three at kick-off against West Ham if Norwich pick up at least a point away to Manchester United on Saturday. But Curtis insisted that despite the club’s current plight the next manager should not be regarded as a short-fix appointment. “We need the right person to deal with the current situation because we find ourselves at the wrong end of the table,” Curtis said. “That has to be addressed, but there also has to be a medium to long-term aspect to the club. “It’s an important decision but the chairman has got these decisions right in the past. “We’ve got to trust in Huw and the board members that the decision is going to be the right one again.” Swansea caretaker manager Alan Curtis admits he has been Googling Marcelo Bielsa this week with the former Argentina and Chile coach the favourite to take over at the Liberty Stadium. Talks between Bielsa and Swansea remain ongoing as club chairman Huw Jenkins attempts to pull off an audacious coup by making the colourful 60-year-old Argentinian a shock successor to Garry Monk. Bielsa has had a celebrated coaching career in taking Argentina and Chile to World Cup finals as well as managing Athletic Bilbao and Marseille in Europe. But Curtis says he has still been doing his research on his iPad this week, checking out the man christened ‘El Loco’ for his volatile character and eccentric ways, and whose high-intensity coaching methods have inspired the likes of Pep Guardiola and Mauricio Pochettino. “Obviously I know his reputation,” Curtis said, ahead of taking charge of Swansea for the second time at home to West Ham on Sunday. “But I don’t know a great deal about him, so I have been Googling him. “When a new manager comes in, you’re never quite sure how he’s going to react or how he deals with players, training and the staff. “But Bielsa’s reputation as a coach is fantastic, and if Pep Guardiola rates him as the best coach ever then he’s obviously somebody you’re bound to learn from.” On the back of Monk’s sacking, Swansea produced a far better performance under Curtis’ stewardship last week when Yaya Toure’s deflected shot in injury time gave Manchester City a fortuitous 2-1 victory. But Swansea’s fifth defeat in six games left them outside the Barclays Premier League relegation zone by virtue of goal difference. Curtis feels a permanent manager must be appointed sooner rather than later, although he says he is prepared to take the team for the Boxing Day home game with West Brom and beyond. Press Associationlast_img read more

BIG MISTAKE? Meghan Markle Redesigns Her Engagement Ring From Prince Harry

first_imgAt first no one noticed the revamped bling when Meghan debuted it along with new baby Archie.Finally, fans started shifting focus from the baby to Meghan’s hand and noticed the change.Did Meghan’s redesign mean that she was not happy with the ring Harry initially gave her while on bended knee during a chicken dinner?Was it a rude mistake?Would you redesign your engagement ring that your husband lovingly designed for you?Would you ask his permission? Meghan Markle has revamped the engagement ring that Harry painstakingly designed for his bride one year ago. Is that a slap in the Prince’s face?Some say yes. Meghan is being slammed for the upgrade because the ring “is a piece of history, not fashion.”Meghan Markle slammed for changing engagement ring – it’s ‘piece of history, not fashion’ https://t.co/xebTsmkTzw pic.twitter.com/Ai4oQ9jI9F— Mirror Royal (@MirrorRoyal) June 25, 2019 The ring still has a larger diamond in the middle from Botswana straddled by two smaller diamonds from Harry’s mum, Diana’s collection.Initially the ring was set in yellow gold, but Markle had the thick gold shank replaced with a thin pave diamond band.It matches the eternity band Harry gave her for their first wedding anniversary.Meghan Markle has blinged up the engagement ring Prince Harry gave her https://t.co/Exii34SviY— The Sun (@TheSun) June 24, 2019last_img read more

Eoin Morgan feels T10 is best format for Olympics

first_imgLONDON: England white-ball captian Eoin Morgan feels T10 could be the best format for cricket to be included at Olympics. The sport hasn’t been part of the showpiece tournament since 1900 when Great Britain won the gold medal after beating France.50-over format was tried at 1998 Commonwealth Games where South Africa beat Australia in the final to clinch the gold medal. Morgan argued that having a short tournament will make it more appealing for the fans and stated that a T10 tournament can be finished inside 10 days, making it perfect for multi-national events like the Olympics or CWG. “The one thing that T10 offers above the three formats that makes it so appealing to an Olympic games or a Commonwealth games is the fact that you can play a whole tournament in the space of 10 days,” Morgan said during a video conference as per ESPNCricinfo. “To have a tournament in such a short space of time maximises the opportunity and the exposure that it will have for the sport,” added Morgan. (IANS)Also Read: Team of 1985 was stronger than 1983: Ravi Shastri Also watch: Tarun Gogoi in an exclusive conversation with Oineetom Ojahlast_img read more