Organisational risk of the Peter Principle

first_imgOrganisational risk of the Peter PrincipleShared from missc on 9 Dec 2014 in Personnel Today Read full article Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed.center_img Related posts:No related photos. The Peter Principle is a concept inwhich the selection of a candidate for a position is based on their performance in their current role rather than on their abilities relevant to the intended role. The business then of course running the risk of promoting someone until they are in a role in which they under-perform. How do we avoid this?From an HR perspective, the risk associated with the Peter Principle can be negated simply taking on-board the direction that an employee wishes to take their career, as opposed to promoting a staff member according to the company organisational structure only. Of course this doesn’t mean that we place less importance on the business objectives, because of course these are very important also – What it does mean that we should be using far more foresight when hiring and aiming to align someone’s key professional growth objectives with the organisational goals as much as possible.When we align an employee’s growth plan with organisational objectives, both parties stand to reap the benefits and in turn minimise risk. The employee is given the opportunity to achieve their professional goals and grow their knowledge and experience in the areas that the business requires that skill/experience which of course limits the likelihood of poor performance.Recruitment needs to become less reactionary (where possible) and more forward thinking and strategic. In doing so, employees will note that you have their best interests in mind along with other commercial interests, and this in turn – in most cases, will be reciprocated in the form of staff being engaged, driven and committed to achievement, all whilst managing potential future risk.last_img read more

Listings 15th-21st Feb

first_imgMUSICQueen’s College Recital Queen’s College Chapel 1315David Rees-Williams Trio Classical J du Pre 2000OUO Sibelius, Nielsen Sheldonian 2000Tallis Barker Piano: Chopin, Beethoven, Haydn Holywell Music Room 1930OCMF Valentine’s Celebration Piano, inc. Faure, Grieig J du Pre 1030Merton Chapel Choir in Concert Finzi, Williams, Jenkins Merton College Chapel 1930The Glitches Carling Academy 1900Mondo Cada Rock Purple Turtle 1900Paradise Island Post-punk Wheatsheaf 2000Witches Rock Cellar 2100Them Is Me Ex-Reef/Lady Sovereign/Bassment Jaxx Jericho Tavern 2000STAGECelebration Burton Taylor 1930Cloudcuckooland North Wall Arts Centre 1400, 1830Stomp New Theatre 1430, 1930This Is Our Youth Moser, Wadham 1400, 1930Timon of Athens Burton Taylor 2130 15th FebFILM4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 1800Azur & Asmar: The Princes Quest (U) Phoenix 1345, 1700, 2015The Bucket List (12A) Odeon George St. 1415, 1700, 2000Cloverfield (15) Odeon George St. 1400, 1630, 1900, 2115Definitely Maybe (12A) Odeon George St. 1435, 1715, 2015John Carpenter’s The Thing (18) Ultimate Picture Palace 1100Jumper (12A) Odeon Magdalen St. 1300, 1530, 1800, 2030Juno (12A) Odeon George St 1330, 1600, 1830, 2100 Phoenix 1245, 1445, 1645, 1900, 2110The Kite Runner (12A) Ultimate Picture Palace 2030National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets (PG) Odeon George St. 1430, 1730, 2030No Country for Old Men (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 1400, 1700, 2000Penelope (U) Odeon George St 1230Sweeney Todd (18) Odeon George St. 1800, 2045There Will Be Blood (15) Phoenix 1345, 1700, 2015The Water Horse (PG) Odeon George St 1245, 1515MUSICThe Plugs & Arrows Bands Purple Turtle 1900Alvin Roy Swing/jazz Chester Arms 2100Chantelle Pike Wheatsheaf 2000A Ghost Devotion, Keshco, Acacia, Ben Constanduros Unsigned Night Jericho Tavern 2000Alex Smoke Electro Cellar 2100 OTHERThe Devil’s Doctor Philip Ball talks about Paracelsus Museum of the History of Science 1900John Taverner: A Medieval Musician Tim Porter Ashmolean 1400 20th Feb FILM4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 2040Azur & Asmar: The Princes Quest (U) Phoenix 1115Be Kind Rewind (12A) Odeon George St. 1200The Bucket List (12A) Odeon George St. 1415, 1700, 2000Cloverfield (15) Odeon George St. 1145, 1400, 1630, 1900, 2115Definitely Maybe (12A) Odeon George St. 1435, 1715, 2015Jumper (12A) Odeon Magdalen St. 1300, 1530, 1800, 2030Juno (12A) Odeon George St 1330, 1600, 1830, 2100 Phoenix 1445, 1645, 1900, 2110The Kite Runner (12A) Ultimate Picture Palace 1800National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets (PG) Odeon George St. 1130, 1430, 1730, 2030No Country for Old Men (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 1400, 1700, 2000Once (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 2000Penelope (U) Odeon George St 1230Sweeney Todd (18) Odeon George St. 1800, 2045There Will Be Blood (15) Phoenix 1345, 1700, 2015The Water Horse (PG) Odeon George St 1245, 1515 MUSICOxford Sinfonia Eroica Beethoven, Mozart, Weber University Church of St Mary 2000Hot Chip Carling Academy 1900Harry Angel Goth Poppers Wheatsheaf 2000STAGEA Couple of Cold Ones OUDS New Writing Festival Burton Taylor 2130The Night of the Iguana O’Reilly, Keble 1930Quills OFS 1930‘Tis Pity She’s A Whore Moser, Wadham 1930Tom’s a-cold OUDS New Writing Festival Burton Taylor 1930 19th Feb FILM4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 2040Azur & Asmar: The Princes Quest (U) Phoenix 1115The Bucket List (12A) Odeon George St. 1415, 1700, 2000Cloverfield (15) Odeon George St. 1145, 1400, 1630, 1900, 2115Definitely Maybe (12A) Odeon George St. 1435, 1715, 2015Jumper (12A) Odeon Magdalen St. 1300, 1530, 1800, 2030Juno (12A) Odeon George St 1330, 1600, 1830, 2100 Phoenix 1245, 1445, 1645, 1900, 2110The Kite Runner (12A) Ultimate Picture Palace 1800National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets (PG) Odeon George St. 1130, 1430, 1730, 2030No Country for Old Men (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 1400, 1700Once (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 2000Penelope (U) Odeon George St 1230Sweeney Todd (18) Odeon George St. 1800, 2045There Will Be Blood (15) Phoenix 1345, 1700, 2015Three Colours: White (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 1900, 2100The Water Horse (PG) Odeon George St 1245, 1515 MUSICRosefield & Dussek Cello & Piano: Beethoven, Chopin Holywell Music Room 1115The Lizzie Newbery Jazz Trio Cape of Good Hope 1900The Cribs, Joe Lean, Does It Offend You, Yeah?, The Ting Tings Shockwaves NME Tour Carling Academy Zodiac 1900STAGEThe Ministry of Mirth Wheatsheaf 2000This Is Our Youth Moser, Wadham 1400, 1930OTHERDr Jim Bennett The Solar Microscope Museum of the History of Science 1430 18th FebFILM4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 1830Azur & Asmar: The Princes Quest (U) Phoenix 1115The Bucket List (12A) Odeon George St. 1415, 1700, 2000Cloverfield (15) Odeon George St. 1145, 1400, 1630, 1900, 2115Definitely Maybe (12A) Odeon George St. 1435, 1715, 2015John Carpenter’s The Thing (18) Ultimate Picture Palace 2300Jumper (12A) Odeon Magdalen St. 1300, 1530, 1800, 2030Juno (12A) Odeon George St 1330, 1600, 1830, 2100 Phoenix 1245, 1445, 1645, 1900, 2110The Kite Runner (12A) Ultimate Picture Palace 1400National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets (PG) Odeon George St. 1130, 1430, 1730, 2030No Country for Old Men (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 1400, 1700, 2000Penelope (U) Odeon George St 1230Sweeney Todd (18) Odeon George St. 1800, 2045There Will Be Blood (15) Phoenix 1345, 1700, 2015Three Colours: White (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 1900, 2100The Water Horse (PG) Odeon George St 1245, 1515STAGEThe Oxford Imps Improvised comedy. Wheatsheaf 2000Free Beer Show TBC + support. Cellar Bar 2115center_img STAGECelebration Burton Taylor 193Cloudcuckooland North Wall Arts Centre 1400, 1830Stomp New Theatre 1730, 2030This Is Our Youth Moser, Wadham 1930Timon of Athens Burton Taylor 2130The Turn of the Screw Hertford Chapel 2000OTHEREnglish Delft Lunchtime gallery talk Randolph Gallery, Ashmolean 1315Dr Kenworthy-Browne Miracles or Coincidences? Okinaga Rm, Wadham 200016th FebFILM4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 1800Azur & Asmar: The Princes Quest (U) Phoenix 1115The Bucket List (12A) Odeon George St. 1415, 1700, 2000Cloverfield (15) Odeon George St. 1145, 1400, 1630, 1900, 2115Definitely Maybe (12A) Odeon George St. 1435, 1715, 2015John Carpenter’s The Thing (18) Ultimate Picture Palace 1100Jumper (12A) Odeon Magdalen St. 1300, 1530, 1800, 2030Juno (12A) Odeon George St 1330, 1600, 1830, 2100 Phoenix 1200, 1530, 2000The Kite Runner (12A) Ultimate Picture Palace 1530, 2030National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets (PG) Odeon George St. 1130, 1430, 1730, 2030No Country for Old Men (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 1400, 1700, 2000Penelope (U) Odeon George St 1230Sweeney Todd (18) Odeon George St. 1800, 2045There Will Be Blood (15) Phoenix 1430, 1745, 2100The Water Horse (PG) Odeon George St 1245, 1515 MUSICOrgan Recital Queen’s College 1310Acoustic Sessions Purple Turtle 1900 STAGEThe Night of the Iguana O’Reilly, Keble 1930Now And Only OUDS New Writing Festival Burton Taylor 2130Quills OFS 1930‘Tis Pity She’s A Whore Moser, Wadham 1930Three Sons OUDS New Writing Festival Burton Taylor 1930The Turn of the Screw Hertford Chapel 2000OTHERStanley Hauerwas: Pentecost Amnesty International lecture Holywell Music Room 1730Professor Alex Potts Art and Life: Theatre of Happenings University Museum of Natural History 1700Professor Simon Deakin The Tanner Lectures on Human Values Said Business School 1700 21st Feb FILM4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 2040Azur & Asmar: The Princes Quest (U) Phoenix 1115Be Kind Rewind (12A) Odeon George St. 1200The Bucket List (12A) Odeon George St. 1415, 1700, 2000Cloverfield (15) Odeon George St. 1145, 1400, 1630, 1900, 2115Definitely Maybe (12A) Odeon George St. 1435, 1715, 2015Jumper (12A) Odeon Magdalen St. 1300, 1530, 1800, 2030Juno (12A) Odeon George St 1330, 1600, 1830, 2100 Phoenix 1245, 1445, 1645, 1900, 2110The Kite Runner (12A) Ultimate Picture Palace 1800National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets (PG) Odeon George St. 1130, 1430, 1730, 2030No Country for Old Men (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 1400, 1700, 2000Once (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 2000Penelope (U) Odeon George St 1230Sweeney Todd (18) Odeon George St. 1800, 2045There Will Be Blood (15) Phoenix 1345, 1700, 2015The Water Horse (PG) Odeon George St 1245, 1515 OTHERGrand Viennese Valentine’s Ball Oxford Town Hall, 2030 17th Feb FILM4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 1730Azur & Asmar: The Princes Quest (U) Phoenix 1115The Bucket List (12A) Odeon George St. 1415, 1700, 2000Cloverfield (15) Odeon George St. 1145, 1400, 1630, 1900, 2115Definitely Maybe (12A) Odeon George St. 1435, 1715, 2015John Carpenter’s The Thing (18) Ultimate Picture Palace 2230Jumper (12A) Odeon Magdalen St. 1300, 1530, 1800, 2030Juno (12A) Odeon George St 1330, 1600, 1830, 2100 Phoenix 1245, 1445, 1645, 1900, 2110The Kite Runner (12A) Ultimate Picture Palace 2000Lightning Over Water (15) Phoenix 1100National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets (PG) Odeon George St. 1130, 1430, 1730, 2030No Country for Old Men (15) Odeon Magdalen St. 1400, 1700, 2000Penelope (U) Odeon George St 1230Sweeney Todd (18) Odeon George St. 1800, 2045There Will Be Blood (15) Phoenix 1345, 1700, 2015Three Colours: White (15) Ultimate Picture Palace 1530The Water Horse (PG) Odeon George St 1245, 1515 MUSICQueen’s College Recital Faure Requiem Queen’s College Chapel 2015St Hilda’s Lunchtime Recital J du Pre 1315Mark Lockheart of Polar Bear fame Spin @ The Wheatsheaf 2100Sandi Thom Zodiac 1900Metronomy Bar @ Carling Academy 1900White Sunday Indie Jericho Tavern 2000 October Game Alt. Rock Cellar 2000 STAGEA Couple of Cold Ones OUDS New Writing Festival Burton Taylor 2130The Night of the Iguana O’Reilly, Keble 1930Omid Djalili New Theatre 2000Quills OFS 1930‘Tis Pity She’s A Whore Moser, Wadham 1930Tom’s a-cold OUDS New Writing Festival Burton Taylor 1930OTHERDebate: Freedom of Belief, Freedom from Belief Amnesty International lecture Holywell Music Room 1730Professor Simon Deakin The Tanner Lectures on Human Values Said Business School 1700Equal Rights 4 Non-Religious? Oxford Town Hall 1900last_img read more

Most Hospital ERs Won’t Treat Your Addiction. These Will.

first_imgIn the meantime, attending physicians and nurses take care of patients’ urgent medical needs. BALTIMORE — For Dr. Zachary Dezman, an emergency physician in this heroin-plagued city, there’s no question that offering addiction medicine to emergency room patients is the right thing to do.People with a drug addiction are generally in poorer health than the rest of the population, he explained. “These patients are marginalized from the health care system. We see people every day who have nowhere else to go.“If they need addiction medicine — and many do — why wouldn’t we give it to them in the ER? We give them medicine for every other life-threatening disease.”But elsewhere in the country, all but a few emergency doctors and hospital administrators see things differently. They worry that offering addiction services could attract even more drug-seeking patients than they already see, taking up valuable staff time and beds, said Dr. Andrew Kolodny, co-director of the Opioid Policy Research Collaborative at Brandeis University. So, for Maryland hospitals, it made financial sense to help as many people as possible with their addictions so they wouldn’t have to keep showing up in their emergency departments, Oros said.Although the stigma associated with addiction is starting to wane among the general public, Brandeis University’s Kolodny said, emergency doctors and nurses see the worst of the worst when it comes to drug users, and many don’t want anything to do with them. Hospital administrators also consider people with addiction to be poor insurance risks in states that have not expanded Medicaid, he said.“But if this movement in Maryland and other states is successful and starts to become normalized nationwide, it could change everything,” Kolodny said.“If you really want to see overdose deaths come down in the United States, getting treatment with buprenorphine has to be easier and cheaper for people with substance use disorders than getting heroin and other opioids on the street. And what could be easier than walking into an ER and getting started on buprenorphine?” Dezman has a special Drug Enforcement Administration license that allows him to prescribe buprenorphine, which is a narcotic.Most emergency physicians don’t have a buprenorphine prescribing license, and Oros said they aren’t willing to complete the eight hours of clinical training required to get it. But under what is known as the three-day rule, doctors without a DEA license can administer a single dose of the medication to a patient within a 72-hour period.As a result, any of the doctors on duty in the ER at Midtown Campus can begin dispensing the potentially life-saving drug and work with a recovery coach to motivate patients to go to a treatment center to get their second and subsequent daily doses. Once patients are stabilized, they can get a monthly prescription for the addiction medication from any primary care doctor who has a DEA license.Open WindowsThe success of addiction assessment and treatment in the ER depends largely on the phase of drug use or withdrawal the patient is in, and whether she is mentally ready to quit.In overdose cases, patients typically feel physically horrible because they’ve woken up in heavy withdrawal and want to get a fix as soon as possible. “But some are ready to think about whether they want to keep doing this for the rest of their lives,” Dezman said.Occasionally, patients will come in on their own and say they want help with their addiction, and they mean it. But it’s not usually that straightforward, explained a Midtown Campus recovery coach, Dwayne Dean. “I might suspect they’re just here for a sandwich and a nap, or to get medications to relieve their withdrawal symptoms. But it’s not for me to judge. I’ve got to catch them in that small window of time.”Since the buprenorphine initiation program began, in July 2017, recovery coaches on duty here at Midtown Campus from 6 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. have screened and interviewed 87 percent of the patients who visit each day.In most cases, the patients they miss are those who are critically ill and need surgery or are immediately transferred to intensive care. To ensure even more patients are screened, the hospital is hiring additional recovery coaches to follow up with critically ill patients once they are stabilized.Breaking BarriersIn Maryland, hospital management consultant Oros says everyone from the executives to the physicians and nurses is enthusiastic about the program.And dozens of treatment providers in the Baltimore area are participating, taking middle-of-the-night calls from ERs and opening their doors earlier than usual to accommodate patients.In 2016, Maryland’s drug and alcohol overdose deaths shot up two-thirds to more than 2,000. More than half of the fatalities occurred in Baltimore County. And Maryland is second only to Massachusetts in the rate of opioid-related emergency visits, according to federal-state data. Despite a raging drug overdose epidemic that is killing nearly 200 Americans every day and sending thousands more to emergency rooms, the vast majority of the nation’s more than 5,500 hospitals have so far avoided offering any form of addiction medicine to emergency patients.That’s starting to change.In Dezman’s ER at the University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus in West Baltimore — and in 10 other Maryland hospitals — addiction services, including starting patients on the highly effective anti-addiction medication buprenorphine, is a new and growing emergency service.Similar services are planned for emergency departments in 18 more Maryland hospitals, according to Marla Oros, president of Mosaic Group, a management consulting firm that is providing technical assistance to the state’s hospitals.Approved by the FDA in 2002 for the treatment of opioid addiction, buprenorphine has been shown to be more than twice as effective as non-medication therapies at helping opioid users quit. Taken daily by mouth, the narcotic medication eliminates withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings, allowing users to feel normal without producing a high.A 2017 study by researchers at Yale School of Medicine found that opioid-addicted patients who were given an initial dose of buprenorphine in an emergency room were twice as likely to be engaged in treatment a month later compared with those who were given only referrals to addiction treatment specialists. Lead author Gail D’Onofrio wrote in an email to Stateline that the practice is spreading.Still, a 2017 survey by the American College of Emergency Physicians showed that only 5 percent of emergency doctors work in hospitals offering the anti-addiction medications buprenorphine or methadone, and 57 percent said that detox and addiction treatment facilities outside of the hospital were “rare or never accessible.”Dr. Eric Weintraub, an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, was an early adopter of buprenorphine in the ER and is now helping spread the concept to other hospitals.Starting in 2003, he initiated patients on buprenorphine in the psychiatric ER at the University of Maryland Medical Center in downtown Baltimore and said he found it very effective at allowing patients to feel normal again and start thinking about treatment.In general, Weintraub said in an interview, “We’ve learned that certain places are conducive to engaging patients in treatment. One of them is the ER. The other is the criminal justice system. We need to grab those opportunities and offer patients effective treatment when they’re ready.”Waiting for PatientsOn a stormy Monday morning in September, the emergency room at Midtown Campus is quiet. Curtained-off patient rooms sit mostly empty and a police officer leans on a counter at the nurses’ station chatting with a doctor.Standing nearby, Dezman glances at the automatic glass doors at the entrance and says a wave of overdose victims could start rolling in at any time.“That’s the way it typically happens,” he said. “We’ll hear from EMS that four people were found within a two-block radius and two more were found dead nearby. It’s almost always because of a bad batch of fentanyl.“If someone were to come in right now or at any time before 4 p.m. and need treatment, ER personnel would screen them and probably send them across the street to the hospital’s Center for Addiction Medicine.”But outside of regular business hours when treatment facilities are typically closed, the ER staff would give willing patients their first oral dose of buprenorphine here, hold them an hour or two for observation, and make an appointment for them with a treatment center for the next morning, he explained.Once patients take buprenorphine their mood changes almost immediately, Dezman said, and they typically are much more open to talking with a coach about follow-up treatment.On average, about 70 people come to Midtown Campus’ ER every day, and two or more of them are here because of an overdose.But in West Baltimore, drug use is so prevalent that the emergency department’s standard protocol is to screen everyone for drug and alcohol abuse, whether they come in for a persistent cough, a broken limb or abdominal pain.First, a triage nurse asks questions about substances patients are using. When patients are suspected of having an addiction, caregivers take urine toxicology screens and a peer recovery coach on staff in the ER talks to patients to see if they are ready to accept treatment. Most Hospital ERs Won’t Treat Your Addiction. These Will.STATELINE September 21, 2018By: Christine Vestal Hospitals That Offer BuprenorphineBuprenorphine initiation and other addiction services are offered in:Baltimore at Bon Secours Hospital, Mercy Hospital, MedStar Harbor Hospital, MedStar Union Memorial, MedStar Good Samaritan, University of Maryland Medical System, University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown, Johns Hopkins Bayview and St. Agnes HospitalBaltimore County at MedStar Franklin Square and Greater Baltimore Medical CenterBoston at Massachusetts General HospitalBrunswick, ME, at Mid Coast HospitalCamden, NJ, at Cooper University Health CareCharleston, SC, at the Medical University of South Carolina University Hospital and two other locationsEureka, CA, at St. Joseph HospitalLos Angeles at LA County and University of Southern California Medical Center, Harbor UCLA Medical Center and Olive View-UCLA Medical CenterMarin County, CA, at Marin General HospitalNew Haven, CT, at Yale-New Haven HospitalOakland, CA at Highland HospitalPhiladelphia at the Hospital of the University of PennsylvaniaPlacerville, CA, at Marshall Medical CenterRedding, CA, at Shasta Regional Medical CenterSacramento, CA, at UC Davis Medical CenterSan Francisco County at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, St. Mary’s Medical Center and St. Francis Memorial HospitalSyracuse, NY, at Upstate University HospitalPlus 17 other hospitals in CaliforniaSource: Stateline research Instead of providing anti-addiction medication, most hospitals typically give ER patients with drug-related conditions the telephone numbers of local treatment clinics, he said. 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St. Mary’s Health Foundation Associate Gifts Produce Powerful Philanthropy

first_imgEvery gift to the Foundation’s Annual Campaign for Excellence, regardless of the amount, makes a difference and produces powerful philanthropy. It is philanthropy that creates a culture and ignites impact.Thank you for Supporting our Healing Ministry!Blessings,Rick PeltierDirector, St. Mary’s Health Foundation(812) 485-4412 | [email protected] St. Mary’s Health Foundation Associate Gifts Produce Powerful PhilanthropyOur associate giving campaign – the Foundation’s Annual Campaign for Excellence – kicked-off in mid-March.I continue to be inspired by the generosity of our associates, physicians and nurses year after year. The total number of donations each year is approximately $160,000. A significant portion of these dollars raised assists associates with unexpected financial challenges, such as rent payments, utility bills, food, clothing and medications through our Associate Benevolence Fund.The following is a Thank You Note from one of our recent recipients:“As a St. Mary’s associate who put her heart and soul into delivering patient care, to be sidelined by Multiple Sclerosis was devastating. In a short period of time, I was the one relying on others to complete life’s basic tasks, which still to this day is very hard for me to accept. The power wheel chair, which was so kindly donated to me from St. Mary’s Health Foundation through the Associate Benevolence Fund, has greatly increased my independence, spirits and the level of hope I proceed forward with in life. From the bottom of my heart, thank you for the donation of my power wheel chair. Your generous and considerate gift will never be forgotten.”And, that, my friends, is very powerful philanthropy – philanthropy that changes lives, save lives and transforms lives.St. Mary’s associates, physicians and nurses are helping us expand our Culture of Philanthropy, because a culture creates change and change ignites impact.I would like to share more examples of how our associates made an impact through their generosity.An associate was diagnosed with cancer and needed assistance to pay her car insurance and rent. The Associate Benevolence Fund assisted by paying her insurance and rent for two months, which allowed her to pay medical expenses, including chemotherapy.A St. Mary’s Warrick associate received assistance with utilities and other household expenses when he needed to reduce the number of hours he worked in order to attend school and study for his board exams. The Associate Benevolence Fund helped him better himself professionally at a time when he was struggling to work, attend school and provide for his family.Donations to the campaign have also assisted our most vulnerable patients.Since June 2016, St. Mary’s Case Management has seen an increase in the homeless population and the need for medical respite services for patients needing shelter while receiving ongoing medical treatment. The Care of the Poor Fund has helped this population.The Care of the Poor Fund also pays for discharge medications for patients with large co-pays and patients without insurance who cannot afford medications. These are just some examples of how our associates change, save and transform lives through their generosity. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Inclusive access to nature at Stone Soup Gardens

first_imgNoele Brown leads the way through the LEAP field maze. FARMINGTON – For almost 40 years, Life Enrichment Advancing People has thrived as a prominent non-profit organization at the forefront of organizing programs to enrich the lives of people with disabilities in Western and Central Maine.Many may already know about their ongoing training services, in-home support groups or their various events throughout the year, all centered around assisting those with disabilities to feel more connected to their home communities. But in 2008, Program Administrator Darryl Wood was tasked with creating an employee wellness program on a tight budget. LEAP had no money for a new fitness center, nutrition classes, or any other kind of resource aiding in overall wellness, so instead Wood thought like a Mainer and turned to nature, creating Stone Soup, a 40-acre trail system that loops up Route 2.“As interest built, we continued to improve and expand the trail, adding fit stations in 2012 and the second loop in 2017. Traditionally the system has been supported by volunteers from within and without LEAP. We also have a vigorous gardening program up there, and over the years we have had community members, United Way volunteers, volunteers from SAD 9 and UMF to maintain both the gardens and the trails. That being said, there are several of us from LEAP who are “regulars” in the upkeep, especially this year,” Wood said.Stones labeled by weight serve as a fit station along the LEAP trail.The communal effort to maintain the trails and gardens is yet another example of LEAP’s effect on the community. By accepting, and encouraging, volunteers from different organizations and institutions, LEAP’s Stone Soup project is only deepening LEAP’s roots in the community at large. Not only are the trails maintained, they are also handicap-accessible, keeping with the inclusivity and equality that LEAP strives to spread.“Our general concept is to continue to make them more accessible to more people as we develop them. Generally speaking, the closer you are to the beginning of the trail, the more accessible the property is. At the very beginning, we have an accessible fit station, and hard and firm pathways that provide access to a row of apple trees and blueberries. In the woods, we have added bridges and culverts, removed rocks and landscaped to make it easier for more people to access. We don’t say any of the system meets ADA standards, however, we want to continue to increase the use for people of all abilities,” Wood said.The gardening program Wood mentions is also near the Stone Soup trails. It’s a project invested in uniting those with disabilities with those without them.“There are two community gardens- one is planted by LEAP to provide fresh vegetables to our staff, supported individuals and sell surplus to the community. The second is a series of 10×20 community plots which we offer up to anyone who needs garden space and agrees to some simple rules we have,” he said.They also have pumpkin patches, raised garden beds and apples and blueberries.April Duval (left) and Jon Duley (right) stop along the LEAP trail to use one of the fit stations.The Stone Soup Gardens and Trails have become a gathering place for people who may normally be kept exclusive from one another. LEAP is not interested in creating a healthy, rich environment just for the LEAP community, they are interested in sowing connections and harvesting from a vast and diverse neighborhood of people.“LEAP has always been about giving back to the community. As a non-profit organization with a charitable mission, we are of and for the benefit of the people who need us. By developing our Stone Soup project, we are able to teach, provide resources, volunteer opportunities and overall healthful experiences to people of all abilities. If we can maintain this stewardship project over time, it creates a mutually beneficial experience- one good for LEAP and good for the community,” Wood said.Jon Duley (left) and April Duval (right) stop to smell the lavender. Wood said they have experimented with making lavender scented hand sanitizer, as well as soap, that will eventually be available to the community.last_img read more

Beating the beetles

first_img“The whole country knows about Boston. When a challenge presents itself, the entire community here comes together. The eradication of the Asian longhorned beetle is a great example of that,” said Gary Woodward, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s deputy undersecretary of marketing and regulatory programs.On a gorgeous Monday morning at the Arnold Arboretum, city, state, and federal authorities, as well as members of the Arboretum staff and officials from surrounding communities, gathered to mark the evident eradication of the Asian longhorned beetle, an invasive insect that since 2008 has devastated the Worcester area (some 34,000 trees had to be destroyed there), and threatened to do the same in Greater Boston.The large, six-legged, black insect with white spots burrows through its victims from the inside, leaving behind big exit holes and dead trees. When the beetle was discovered across the street from the Arboretum in 2010, infesting six trees on the grounds of the Faulkner Hospital, it was feared that it would wreak havoc on the Arboretum’s priceless collection of 15,000 woody plants.As part of a coordinated response that included the Arboretum and government authorities, a 10-mile quarantine zone was set up around the infestation area. Intensive, coordinated efforts ensued to identify, contain, and eradicate the beetle. The quarantine was officially lifted at Monday’s ceremony.Jack Murray, commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, described the collaboration as an example of what’s possible “when the community comes together around shared goals.” Arboretum Director William “Ned” Friedman credited “partnerships that reached across universities to cities and state and the federal government,” and declared, “Today the Arboretum is safe, as are the communities around us.”To understand how the campaign to safeguard the Arboretum worked, the Gazette spoke with Stephen Schneider, its director of operations.GAZETTE: What was the worst-case scenario when the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) was discovered near the Arboretum back in 2010?SCHNEIDER: The ALB had the potential to devastate our trees. In New England, maple trees in particular are so valuable economically, especially for the syrup and tourism industries. When there’s any sign of ALBs on a tree, regulations require that the tree be taken [destroyed].It could have been a far different story here. If the infestation had spread, the Arboretum could have lost several major collections, including our comprehensive birch and maple collection. Aside from watching our collections being wiped out, the city of Boston would have lost trees wherever you have swaths of maple, which is a lot of places, such as along tree-lined streets and throughout the Blue Hills.GAZETTE: How were the ALBs first detected?SCHNEIDER: It happened right across the street from the Arboretum on the grounds of the Faulkner Hospital. The groundskeeper there noticed that something was eating their trees, and ultimately alerted federal authorities, who moved in fast once ALBs were identified. Six red maples had to be destroyed. We were lucky because the ALBs had just emerged from the Faulkner trees and hadn’t had enough time to fly over to other nearby trees.GAZETTE: What was the Arboretum’s response to the discovery of ALBs across the street?SCHNEIDER: We’d seen an ALB infestation in Worcester a few years before, so we were already on alert. In 2008, we set up a system to scout our trees for ALBs, and we also created a response plan just in case. When ALBs show up, you immediately lose ownership of the situation. The approach then needs to be one of collaboration with state and federal authorities. We were prepared and followed our response plan, which included engaging closely with those authorities. Luckily, we’d just finished our scouting, and we had a pretty good idea that we didn’t have a major, Worcester-like infestation on our hands.GAZETTE: How would you describe working with government agencies in coordinating an effective response to the ALB threat?SCHNEIDER: In conjunction with the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture), we began conducting a comprehensive ground and canopy survey of all ALB host species, which took months. The federal response protocols also required doing pre-emptive pesticide treatment around a quarter-mile radius. We took issue with their pre-emptive approach, given that our comprehensive survey didn’t turn up further signs of ALB infestation. Our approach is to use chemicals when we have a known, real threat, not one that “might” exist. There was much debate and disagreement on this issue. Fortunately, we had already developed a good, collaborative relationship with federal authorities, so we were able to engage in intelligent conversations around these issues without people taking things too personally.All sides understood that we were trying to do what’s best for the collection here. After much debate, the bottom line emerged that we needed to follow the federal protocols regarding pre-emptive chemical treatments, but federal authorities allowed us to use our know-how and technology in doing so.We used our GIS (geographic information system) mapping equipment and our GIS program to be more precise in targeting those plants that would get soil treatments versus those having to get trunk injections (which are more stressful on trees). Furthermore, we strategically removed some scrub plants that were not part of our collection. At the end of this process, and using all our know-how, we succeeded in cutting in half the amount of chemicals the federal government used in our collections, which also saved taxpayers money. We always want to use chemicals responsibly, if we need to use them at all, even though we understood that federal protocols mandated pre-emptive treatments.GAZETTE: What lessons have you learned from the successful collaboration to eradicate the ALB in Boston?SCHNEIDER: The whole process confirms that having a response plan already in place works. Working closely with governments, developing these important relationships, will also help us moving forward against other potential infestations. Government authorities showed they were open to collaboration, applying their protocols in a more flexible way, especially in regard to chemical treatments. They’re starting to say now: ‘We really need to look at each infestation on an individual basis,’ as happened here in Boston. I believe that their being so open to hearing what we had to say, about how dynamic and different each ecosystem is, really helped response efforts. They took into account our intelligent pushback and questioning, which we offered in a solution-oriented way, and collaboration really worked here.last_img read more

Something Rotten’s Christian Borle & Kate Reinders Hang Out at Broadway.com

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 1, 2017 Related Shows Something Rotten! View Comments There’s Something Rotten at the St. James Theatre this spring—Christian Borle and Kate Reinders will star in the new Broadway musical comedy beginning March 23. But before cracking up the masses, Borle and Reinders spent the day with the Broadway.com group sales team at their New York City headquarters. Featuring music and lyrics by Wayne and Karey Kirkpatrick and a book by Karey Kirkpatrick and John O’Farrell, the new production is a wacky and hilarious take on our two favorite things: musicals and the Bard. Check out this Hot Shot of Borle and Reinders with the staff, then see them in Something Rotten on Broadway!last_img read more

Lessons of the Week! Aaron Tveit, Jennifer Lopez & More

first_imgAaron Tveit, Jennifer Lopez, John Mulaney, Nick Kroll, Ben Platt, Jennifer Hudson, Andy Karl & Orfeh(Photos: Emilio Madrid-Kuser, Ethan Miller/Getty Images, Brian Bowen Smith/NBC & Bruce Glikas) The Color Purple Will Never Leave YouEven when she’s big, blonde and beautiful, the color purple stays with her. Broadway.com readers voted Jennifer Hudson’s “I Know Where I’ve Been” as the best performance of Hairspray Live!, but before the show-stopper, she donned a purple getup that reminded us of blades of corn, honeybees, waterfalls, etc. A The Color Purple Live! could work, right? Are you reading this, NBC? Oh, you are? Yay! Smash. Andy & Orfeh Are Our New DirectionIt’s unclear if One Direction will come back from their hiatus, but for now, at least we have this. Broadway power couple Andy Karl and Orfeh gave us a taste of their new Feinstein’s/54 Below show with “History.” If 1D ever needs any new members, here are two who would definitely fit right in. Karl’s even got boy band experience. John Mulaney & Nick Kroll Love a HolidayMove over, Audra. Broadway’s got a new Billie Holiday. Two Billies, in fact. While visiting Broadway.com HQ, Oh, Hello headliners John Mulaney and Nick Kroll somehow found themselves impersonating the blues legend. If we’re being honest, it was closer to Miss Piggy than Billie. Uh, take a seat, boys. Mama Broadway’s got this covered. Judy Kuhn Got Checked By Her SetWhat’s harder than living down a flop? Try being in a flop with set pieces that have minds of their own. When Fiddler’s Judy Kuhn was telling us about her days in Chess, she recalled the giant towers manned by the crew that occasionally went wayward when the communication system failed. Suddenly, all that falling and disappearing furniture in Fun Home seems like a cake walk. Joell Ortiz Wants to Be a JellicleNow that Joell Ortiz has entered the theater world thanks to Lin-Manuel Miranda, we might just see him sing and dance (and purr) on the Great White Way. At the Hamilton Mixtape launch concert, the rapper said that he’d love to give Cats a hip-hop twist. What would his Jellicle name be? We’re leaning toward Joell the Brooklyn Bullshit Cat (Parental Advisory). Happy Friday, and happy anniversary of that crazy Alice in Wonderland with Carol Channing! While you celebrate with jam tomorrow, jam yesterday, but never jam today, let’s take a look back at some of the wackiest and wildest stories from the past seven days on the Great White Way. It’s time for the Lessons of the Week! Sheryl Lee Ralph Is Our Fave Film CriticIt’s awards season, and as a batch of highly anticipated flicks arrive, everyone has opinions. However, the only person we want to decide a critics’ darling is this critic, darling. On Call Me Madame, Wicked diva Sheryl Lee Ralph reviewed Hidden Figures, giving it a rave. After her stint in Wicked, we hope she starts her own web series: Morrible Movie Meter. We’d subscribe. Obviously. View Comments Audrey II’s Coming Back For YouShing-a-ling, a remake of Little Shop is happening (look out)! The cult fave is getting the big screen treatment once more with Supergirl producer Greg Berlanti at the helm. We’re still a ways off from knowing anything about casting, but we have a dream pair in mind for Seymour and Audrey….provided they can take a break from their new gig as part of One Direction. Ahem. A Block Is a Block, Says Richard H. BlakeDon’t be fooled by the rocks that she got; she’s still Jenny from the block. Which block? Don’t ask Richard H. Blake. At the opening of A Bronx Tale, we learned he didn’t know Jennifer Lopez was from the borough his show is named after. Apparently, “the block” wasn’t specific enough for him. Come on, Richard. No matter where she goes, she still knows where she came from. Why don’t you? The DEH Crew Is Hip AFEven if you’re in (or at) a hot new show like Dear Evan Hansen, that doesn’t mean your millennial lexicon is on fleek. At the opening, we quizzed the stars on Internet acronyms. The one nearly everyone—Aaron Tveit included—seemed to know? AF or “as f*ck.” You haven’t lived until you’ve heard your Broadway BAE shout AF IRL, TBH. Ben Platt Does Once Multiple TimesHow does Ben Platt prepare for a physically, vocally and emotionally challenging performance of Dear Evan Hansen? Did you guess somber ballads from a Tony-winning introspective musical? You should have. Laura Dreyfuss spilled the beans on Platt, revealing her co-star routinely warms up to Once. It’s just the thing to do before you’re falling slowly through a window. (That’s how it goes, right?)last_img read more

Jay Jacobs: Every Dog Has His Day

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The life of a political party leader isn’t all screening candidates, holding fundraisers and orchestrating campaigns. Nassau County Democratic Party Chairman Jay Jacobs also runs a half-dozen camps. We caught up with Jacobs, who shared why he quotes The Honeymooners, collects owls, and credits Donald Trump with recent local Democratic gains.Long Island Press: For the first time, Democrats and women hold the Nassau County executive seat and two of three town supervisor seats in the county. To what do you credit this historic change?Jay Jacobs: The public was ready for change. Between the corruption in the towns and the county on the Republican side and the fact that the finances have been so poorly managed both on the town level and the county level, it gave Democrats a great opportunity to take those seats.LIP: Did you ever think you’d ever see the day?JJ: We were coming into a very strong political environment, both with the corruption in the county as well as nationally with Trump and all of the turmoil and tumult he has brought to the political process.LIP: What is your vision for Nassau County?JJ: In one sense cleaning up the government and restoring trust. In the second sense, taking control of the finances and finally putting us on the path to fiscal solvency. And the third being creating a vision for what the future of Nassau will be and then starting us on the road to getting us there.LIP: You also run three sleepaway camps and three day camps. How did you get into that line of work?JJ: The camp that I went to when I was a camper and worked at when I was 23 was for sale. The owners liked me, turned it over to me and then I built from there. I love the job of being a camp director and I also love the job of building a larger corporation, which has multiple camps, a school, and now we’ve got bed and breakfast inns upstate.LIP: What’s your favorite story from camp?JJ: I love going on what we call raid patrol at night, making sure the boys and girls are in their bunks appropriately. I’m not one who plays by the rules. If I’ve got a camper out of his bed and I’m having difficulty finding him, I know that sooner or later he’s gonna come back. And there has been more than one time that camper’s come back to find me in his bed.LIP: How do you juggle your business obligations with the rough-and-tumble career in politics?JJ: If you come into my office, you’ll see everywhere a large collection of owls. They represent my biggest problem and my most important problem in both business and politics: Who? Who am I going to get to run in the 10th legislative district? Who am I going to get to to be on duty tonight at boys’ bunk 9? When some comes into my office with agreat idea, I always take one of the owls and I pound it on the desk and I say, “Who? Who’s going to run it?” When you focus on the owls, both in politics and business, and you bring in really good people and you delegate to them and you nurture them, and you take care of them and you let them get the credit for the things that they get done so that they feel an ownership, then you have a system that enables you to get a lot of things done.LIP: What story best sums up the considerations that go into being a party leader?JJ: I have a saying I take from the words of the immortal philosopher Ralph Kramden, whom you might remember from The Honeymooners. Ralph Kramden said “every dog has his day.” I live by those words. Because I get disappointed so many times. I’m a person who believes that if you give your word, you can take it to the bank. But so many people don’t in politics. So many people that you help along the way forget you when they get there. There’s an arrogance that goes on in politics. And I keep that phrase in my mind because every time I feel I’ve gotten the raw end of a deal and somebody isn’t treating me right, you can get stressed and aggravated. I don’t. What goes around comes around. Every dog has his day.LIP: What would readers be surprised to learn about your personal life?JJ: I happen to be an introvert. I have to work up to being able to reach out and do my job. It’s an advantage in some sense. I find that being an introvert, while it’s more difficult for me to do certain things, I think that it may make me a little more thoughtful and attentive to people.last_img read more

Reps to CFPB: Higher HMDA exemption level, less ‘adverse impact’

first_imgNineteen members of the U.S. Congress–all members of the House Financial Services Committee–wrote to Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Richard Cordray this week expressing numerous concerns about the impact on consumers of recently finalized requirements under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA).The CFPB finalized new reporting requirements in October, which CUNA believes will add to the already heavy reporting burden faced by credit unions.“In light of the potential of the new rule to reduce consumer access to mortgage credit, we write to request that the CFPB provide analysis on the effects of applying higher exemption thresholds based on an institution’s annual mortgage origination volume,” the letter reads. “Higher thresholds would help alleviate the potential adverse impact of the final rule.”The CFPB’s rule exempts institutions originating less than 25 closed-end mortgages and fewer than 100 open-end lines of credit in each of the two preceding years, which covers roughly 1,400 estimates, according to the CFPB. continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more