Stars Sign Guitar For Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy Charity

first_imgTo raise vital funds for music therapy charity Nordoff Robbins’ work transforming lives through music, live music promoters Music Plus Sport – who organise The Jockey Club Live concerts – will be supporting the charity by auctioning a celebrity signed guitar.The Yamaha acoustic guitar has already been signed by Kaiser Chiefs, Status Quo, Boyzone and Madness. The initiatives will also see other artists including Tom Jones, Spandau Ballet and McBusted, who are set to perform at various racecourses across the country as part of The Jockey Club Live, sign the guitar as well.The Jockey Club Live promotes outdoor music events at 15 leading racecourses nationwide including Newmarket, Haydock Park and Sandown Park“The Jockey Club Live is proud to be supporting music therapy charity Nordoff Robbins through our live music events this year, helping to raise vital funds and spreading the word about the incredible impact music can have on vulnerable people up and down the country,” said Andrew Wilkinson, Director of Music Plus Sport.The guitar will be auctioned later on in the year, with all proceeds going directly to Nordoff Robbins’ work transforming lives through music.last_img read more

Add a protein twist to your fitness regime

first_imgThe right amount of protein intake always goes hand-in-hand with a strict fitness regime to remain hale and hearty, suggest experts. Losing out on the required protein intake leads to a number of adverse effects, including muscle breakdown, weakness, fatigue and premature hair loss. In fact, the increasing incidence of many of the physical issues in our country, such as muscle loss, low immunity and body soreness can also be attributed to low protein intake. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfAccording to the Nutritionist, protein deficiency often leads to an early onslaught of sarcopenia, or more simply, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength due to ageing. “Protein is the glue that holds our muscles and tissues together, and people who fail to take adequate protein, are bound to suffer from sarcopenia. The best way to combat sarcopenia is by making sure your body gets its ideal intake of protein.” According to them, the recommended dietary intake (RDA) for protein for Indians is 1 gm per kg body weight. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive”A person weighing 60 kg will require 60 gm of protein on a daily basis. Vegetarians, especially, have limited options for protein-rich food like soya, cereals and pulses. Since increased soy intake has poor acceptance in our country and has controversial health implications, milk protein can be an important source of first class protein, when one is trying to increase protein intake.” In the research, experts further shared insights on how milk protein has two components: whey and casein. “Whey protein has the benefit of being absorbed faster in the body, and can supplement and augment protein synthesis. The golden window where protein intake is most beneficial is 45 minutes after a workout, as that is when our bodies absorb protein the fastest. For that purpose, consuming easily digestible protein sources like whey would be ideal.” Adding whey to daily meals can help. “It is easy to give a protein twist to your daily meal by replacing your morning cup of tea or coffee with a healthy smoothie or a milkshake containing fruits, yoghurt/milk and whey. Whey protein powder is great to mix into such shakes, or taken alongside your traditional breakfast of idlis or oats or for the really time strapped, to be carried in a shaker to consume on the way to work,” experts added.last_img read more

This Startup Has Figured Out How to Grow Metal Like a Tree

first_img Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now A Seattle startup has found a way to grow high performance metals in a cheap and energy efficient way, marking an important breakthrough for industries like construction, automotive, and oil and gas.You can already find some of the metals from seven-year-old company Modumetal on oil rigs off of the Australian and African coasts, as well as the U.S., off of Texas. Those metals can withstand the ocean’s corrosive power for up to eight times longer than conventional materials, according to the company.On Tuesday, Modumetal took a big step towards its goal of gaining a bigger market for its innovative recipe. The company said that it had raised $33.5 million in funding that will go to increasing production and sales along with developing new uses for its metals.The funding was led by the Founders Fund, the firm co-created by Silicon Valley investor Peter Thiel that has previously invested in space cargo company SpaceX, room rental service Airbnb and data giant Palantir. Other investors include the venture arms of three oil big companies, Chevron Technology Ventures, BP Ventures and ConocoPhillips.Modumetal’s CEO and co-founder Christina Lomasney, a physicist who’s spent years working on electrochemistry and advanced materials, told Fortune that the company’s metal growing process is “the ideal way of making materials.” It is similar to the way that “Mother Nature has evolved [growing things] over eons,” she said.Some of the more conventional ways to extract and use various types of metals often include large amounts of heat. Many metals are mined and then extracted from the ores through smelting at a high temperature. Companies can also reuse metal scraps, but they must be melted and cast into usable shapes.In contrast, Modumetal’s process only uses electricity, and therefore uses far less energy. The company’s metal process is similar to the more conventional method of electroplating, which is when electricity is used to create a metal coating on a surface.However, Modumetal uses nanotechnology — manipulation of matter at the molecular level — to micromanage at a very small scale to better control the conditions and substances through which electroplating occurs. Basically, the company grows metal on a surface in a way that makes it easier to shape and tinker with the material’s characteristics. Lomasney says it’s similar to how nature controls the environment related to a tree’s growth— sunlight, soil, location, temperature—and then creates a tree that is a product those conditions.A conventional metal part is made by standard processes on the left, and a metal part grown by startup Modumetal on the right.Photo courtesy of Will Foster, willfosterphoto.comThe process creates a metal that is grown layer-by-layer. The different ways to grow the layers creates variety in the metal’s properties and shape. Lomasney says to think about the resulting material like plywood, but the plies, or pieces, are created at the nanotech level.The industry calls these layered metals “metal laminates,” and they’ve been around in the industry for a while. Lomasney’s breakthrough is using a chemical and electrical production process combined with nanotechnology to create the metal plywoods at a low cost, with low energy and with the ability to make the metal pieces in large volumes and with large pieces (think oil rig big).The company is making a laminated zinc alloy for its customers that want a metal that won’t corrode as fast as standard zinc. But laminated steel could be the big market for Modumental. The company considers its strong and long-lasting steel product as the next-generation of the steel industry.Modumetal’s original technology was created by Lomasney and her co-founder, chemical engineer John Whitaker. The partners previously worked on using electricity and chemistry to clean up toxic environments. After noticing their work, the Defense Department approached them to work on making advanced materials that could produce armor for soldiers that would be both very strong (stop bullets) but also last a long time (stop bullets over many years).Lomasney and Whitaker spun out the core armor-making tech to start Modumetal. The company now has a research and development lab in Seattle, a factory in Maltby, Wash., and a field services office in Houston, Tex. The funds will help the company grow production at its factory in Maltby.Despite the company’s ambition and promise, the startup world can be extraordinarily difficult. Expanding factory production can be particularly hard for a small company. Large scale manufacturing requires production to be precisely repeated over and over again, with little variation, which can be challenging with new technologies.In addition the company is selling into long established and sometimes slow moving industries. While the company seems to have won over oil companies early on, big metal makers, car companies, aviation firms and construction companies can be notoriously risk averse and tend to shy away from partnering with young venture-capital backed startups.Some of the biggest materials and metals companies around the world, which have some of the deepest pockets, and also are likely working on competitive technologies. The company will need to aggressively protect its patents —the core of its business—through both acquisition and legal action.Modumetal sees the corrosion-protected metals as its first big market. But there are many other possibilities that the company and its customers are interested in. For example, Modumetal has a joint venture with one of the largest U.S. sheet metal makers, Steel Dynamics, to come up with applications for an upgraded version of sheet metal in the future.Metal production isn’t often talked about. It’s not a particularly sexy topic. But if Modumetal can get its metals into everything from skyscrapers to airplanes, the company could make a big mark. It’s like how 3D printing is introducing an entirely new and easier way to print plastics and other materials into shapes that either couldn’t previously be made or would otherwise take a lot of effort to create.In the 1800’s, aluminum was so expensive to make that it was confined to trinkets like Napoleon’s buttons and flatwear, Lomasney says. But in the late 1800’s, inventor Charles Martin Hall created a way to inexpensively make aluminum. He created a massive new industry and co-founded aluminum giant Alcoa. If Modumetal could gain a fraction of the traction that Alcoa has had it would be a major success. This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 6 min read Enroll Now for Free This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine August 26, 2015last_img read more