UK food bank usage rises again with benefit delays the most common

first_imgThe number of people in the UK having to rely on food banks to eat has increased again this year, according to a leading charity.The Trussell Trust, which operates hundreds of food banks across the country, gave out three-day food parcels to 519,342 people in the six months to the end of September – including 188,584 to children.This is an increase compared to the 506,369 parcels the charity gave out during the equivalent months of 2015 and means that the Trussell Trust is on course to deliver a record number of food parcels this year. British director Ken Loach celebrates on stage after being awarded with the Palme d'Or for the film "I, Daniel Blake" during the closing ceremony of the 69th Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France, on May 22, 2016 Use regions/landmarks to skip ahead to chart.Regional variation in Trussell Trust food bank usage. Percentage change in visitor volume between first halves of 2015-16 and 2016-17Long description.No description available.Structure.Chart type: column chart.column series with 12 columns.The chart has 1 X axis displaying categories.The chart has 1 Y axis displaying values.Chart graphic.Regional variation in Trussell Trust food bank usageRegional variation in Trussell Trust food bank usage – Highcharts CloudRegional variation in Trussell Trust food bank usagePercentage change in visitor volume between first halves of 2015-16 and2016-17Percentage change in visitor volume between first halves of 2015-16 and 2016-17Northern IrelandEast MidlandsEastNorth WestScotlandWalesSouth WestWest MidlandsSouth EastYorkshire & HumberLondonNorth East-40%-30%-20%-10%0%10%20%30%40%50%Source: Trussell Trust One of the scenes in Ken Loach’s Palme d’Or winning film I, Daniel Blake takes place in a food bankCredit:Valerie Hache/AFP The number of food banks operating in the UK has increased in recent years and they have come to be seen by many as symbolic of a widening inequality gap.There are hundreds of small independent food bank operators across the UK so the Trussell Trust’s statistics alone cannot be used as a measure of the raw volume of people needing emergency food.However, due to their nationwide coverage, Trussell Trust food banks can be used as a way to gauge trends in demands for emergency food and the factors driving people to need it.The most common reason for people needing to attend a Trussell Trust food bank was because of delays in receiving benefits payments or due to changes in the benefits they were entitled to.Over two in five people attending Trussell Trust food banks between April and September this year gave benefits changes or delays as one the reasons they needed emergency food. Use regions/landmarks to skip ahead to chart.Food parcels distributed by the Trussell Trust. Three-day emergency food parcels given out at food banks between April and SeptemberLong description.No description available.Structure.Chart type: column chart.column series with 3 columns.The chart has 1 X axis displaying values.The chart has 1 Y axis displaying values.Chart graphic.Food parcels distributed by the Trussell TrustFood parcels distributed by the Trussell Trust – Highcharts CloudFood parcels distributed by the Trussell TrustThree-day emergency food parcels given out at food banks between Apriland SeptemberThree-day emergency food parcels given out at food banks between April and September492 641492 641506 369506 369519 342519 3422014201520160100k200k300k400k500k600kSource: Trussell Trust Use regions/landmarks to skip ahead to chart.Reasons for Trussell Trust food bank usage. Proportion of attendees who gave each reason for needing emergency food, April-September 2016Long description.No description available.Structure.Chart type: column chart.column series with 6 columns.The chart has 1 X axis displaying categories.The chart has 1 Y axis displaying values.Chart graphic.Reasons for Trussell Trust food bank usageReasons for Trussell Trust food bank usage – Highcharts CloudReasons for Trussell Trust food bank usageProportion of attendees who gave each reason for needing emergency food,April-September 2016Proportion of attendees who gave each reason for needing emergency food, April-September 2016Benefit delaysLow incomeBenefit changesDebtHomelessnessSickness0%5%10%15%20%25%30%Source: Trussell Trust A Department for Work and Pensions spokesperson said: “Reasons for food bank use are complex so it’s misleading to link them to any one issue and the vast majority of benefits are processed on time.“We know that work is the best route out of poverty and employment is at a record high. But for those who need extra support, we provide a strong safety net through the welfare system, including hardship payments, benefit advances and budgeting loans.”The DWP also noted that Jobcentre Plus District Managers already have the flexibility to work with food banks on a local level if they wish, as they do with other local community initiatives such as hostels for homeless people.An example of a local partnership on food banks is the Lalley Centre in Manchester where a Work Coach currently visits the centre one day each month. Low income was the second most common reason for needing emergency food, with one in four food bank attendees citing it.David McAuley, Chief Executive of The Trussell Trust, said: “As the number of emergency food parcels provided to people by food banks rises once again, it’s clear that more can be done to get people back on their feet faster. Many food banks now host independent welfare and debt advisers but they cannot solve all the issues.“To stop UK hunger we must make sure the welfare system works fairly and compassionately, stopping people getting to a point where they have no money to eat.”It feels like we could be seeing a new era at the DWP with a consultation on Work Capability Assessments and willingness to engage in dialogue with charities working on the front line. A telephone hotline could build on this and go a long way to improving food banks ability to help get people out of a crisis faster.” On a regional level, Northern Ireland saw the largest increase in Trussell Trust food bank usage with numbers up by 43 per cent in the six months to the end of September 2016 compared with the equivalent period in 2015.The East Midlands saw the next largest increase (up 16.4 per cent), while the North East was the only region to see the number of visitors to Trussell Trust food banks decrease compared to last year. 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Official song of the Womens EHF EURO 2010

← Previous Story GB sensation: Win over Slovakia! Next Story → German Bundesliga (Round 14): The “Lions” finally broke wounded “Zebras” EHF EURO 2010 Norway and Denmark Two of the most exciting artists of the Danish music scene, singer Anna David and Jimmy Colding from the pop group Zididada – known for many years and even more for their famous hits – took the EHF EURO 2010 as an occasion to team up and to record a sports anthem with international potential.The theme “Out of the Dark – Into the Light” is about embarking upon the task of fighting and ultimately being able to celebrate the triumph. So even if the song does not deal specifically with handball, there are obvious thematic parallels to situations that the handball players at the EHF EURO 2010 will face.[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nNEMpdAXRk&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]Anna David, who turns 26 five days before the opening of the EHF EURO 2010, got her first record deal already as a 14 year old. Nowadays she can look back on solid experience with her immense talent that later came to full maturity on the album “Music Is Taking over” released October 2010.Jimmy Colding (41) has celebrated a decade of success with his band Zididada. Very few have escaped being infected by the joie de vivre that Denmark’s probably best live band shares with tracks like “Rock My Boat”, “Sugartop”, Zididada Day”, “Los Reventados” and “Walking on Water “.Together, Anna and Jimmy turned the song “Into the Light” into a fantastic sound, and the two artists are very happy with their cooperation.“Women’s handball has always filled a part of my life since my mom is a big fan of handball. It is therefore an honour for me to help backing up the cool chicks,” said Anna David. “I am impressed with the girls fighting spirit and their will and I am extra excited to be part of the EHF EURO 2010, and then even to see the girls up close.”Jimmy Colding added: “The song was already written in September together with Lars Quang and we were allowed to present it to the Danish and Norwegian national teams in the NRGi Arena in Aarhus on 24 September in a 100% acoustic version. The response was tremendous, and with that very positive mood we felt, it was really great to do a studio session.”The lyrics in “Into the Light” are meant as a manifestation of being courageous, independent and headstrong. When we in the chorus sing “Crazy” it is meant in the sense that the ones who take the lead, initially often appear to be crazy, but as success becomes a reality, it’s just the crazyness that made the success.” said Jimmy Colding.So the next twelve days starting from 7 December 2010, there is not much more for both players and spectators to say than “Into the light, let’s go crazy!”text: ehf-euro.com read more