UGA Trial Gardens

first_imgGeorgia’s summer heat is on, bringing with it a wealth of beautiful blooms. View the best summer has to offer at the University of Georgia Trial Gardens open house July 10 from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m.Located on the UGA campus in Athens, Ga., between Snelling Dining Hall and the R. C. Wilson Pharmacy Building, the gardens are where hundreds of annuals and perennials from plant breeders around the world are tested and displayed each year. The gardens are always open to visitors free of charge. During the annual open house, however, tours will be led by UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences horticulture professor Allan Armitage and his students. A well-known writer, speaker, researcher and teacher, Armitage spearheaded the garden’s creation in 1982.In addition to being a popular site for gardeners, CAES faculty and staff use it for research and teaching. The gardens are also a resource for breeders, retailers, growers, landscapers and consumers.A plant sale featuring interesting and hard-to-find plants is a major feature of this year’s open house. Rain barrels and garden art from a local artist will be available for purchase, too. The event will be held rain or shine. A donation of $5 is requested. Parking is available in the South Campus Parking Deck. For more information, visit the website ugatrial.hort.uga.edu.last_img read more

UBS pays $445 million to settle NCUA claims

first_img continue reading » UBS Group AG has paid $445 million to settle National Credit Union Administration claims that the bank contributed to the collapse of corporate credit unions by selling them faulty mortgage-backed securities, the regulator said in a statement on Monday.NCUA said the settlement — which Zurich-based UBS agreed to without admitting or denying wrongdoing — closes a lawsuit filed in 2012 and is the latest in a series of deals struck with banks accused of improper sales to five corporate credit unions that failed. The agency had already recovered $79.3 million from UBS last year in a related claim.“With today’s settlement, another legacy matter has been resolved,” said Peter Stack, a UBS spokesman.The settlement is tied to losses at U.S. Central Federal Credit Union and Western Corporate Federal Credit Unions, institutions that provided loans and other services to customer-facing credit unions before they were taken into conservatorship in 2009 and later shuttered.In similar cases against a long list of big banks, NCUA has recovered almost $5 billion in settlements that have provided “a measure of accountability for the firms that sold faulty securities to the corporate credit unions,” NCUA Acting Board Chairman J. Mark McWatters said in a statement. 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more