Jay Jacobs: Every Dog Has His Day

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The life of a political party leader isn’t all screening candidates, holding fundraisers and orchestrating campaigns. Nassau County Democratic Party Chairman Jay Jacobs also runs a half-dozen camps. We caught up with Jacobs, who shared why he quotes The Honeymooners, collects owls, and credits Donald Trump with recent local Democratic gains.Long Island Press: For the first time, Democrats and women hold the Nassau County executive seat and two of three town supervisor seats in the county. To what do you credit this historic change?Jay Jacobs: The public was ready for change. Between the corruption in the towns and the county on the Republican side and the fact that the finances have been so poorly managed both on the town level and the county level, it gave Democrats a great opportunity to take those seats.LIP: Did you ever think you’d ever see the day?JJ: We were coming into a very strong political environment, both with the corruption in the county as well as nationally with Trump and all of the turmoil and tumult he has brought to the political process.LIP: What is your vision for Nassau County?JJ: In one sense cleaning up the government and restoring trust. In the second sense, taking control of the finances and finally putting us on the path to fiscal solvency. And the third being creating a vision for what the future of Nassau will be and then starting us on the road to getting us there.LIP: You also run three sleepaway camps and three day camps. How did you get into that line of work?JJ: The camp that I went to when I was a camper and worked at when I was 23 was for sale. The owners liked me, turned it over to me and then I built from there. I love the job of being a camp director and I also love the job of building a larger corporation, which has multiple camps, a school, and now we’ve got bed and breakfast inns upstate.LIP: What’s your favorite story from camp?JJ: I love going on what we call raid patrol at night, making sure the boys and girls are in their bunks appropriately. I’m not one who plays by the rules. If I’ve got a camper out of his bed and I’m having difficulty finding him, I know that sooner or later he’s gonna come back. And there has been more than one time that camper’s come back to find me in his bed.LIP: How do you juggle your business obligations with the rough-and-tumble career in politics?JJ: If you come into my office, you’ll see everywhere a large collection of owls. They represent my biggest problem and my most important problem in both business and politics: Who? Who am I going to get to run in the 10th legislative district? Who am I going to get to to be on duty tonight at boys’ bunk 9? When some comes into my office with agreat idea, I always take one of the owls and I pound it on the desk and I say, “Who? Who’s going to run it?” When you focus on the owls, both in politics and business, and you bring in really good people and you delegate to them and you nurture them, and you take care of them and you let them get the credit for the things that they get done so that they feel an ownership, then you have a system that enables you to get a lot of things done.LIP: What story best sums up the considerations that go into being a party leader?JJ: I have a saying I take from the words of the immortal philosopher Ralph Kramden, whom you might remember from The Honeymooners. Ralph Kramden said “every dog has his day.” I live by those words. Because I get disappointed so many times. I’m a person who believes that if you give your word, you can take it to the bank. But so many people don’t in politics. So many people that you help along the way forget you when they get there. There’s an arrogance that goes on in politics. And I keep that phrase in my mind because every time I feel I’ve gotten the raw end of a deal and somebody isn’t treating me right, you can get stressed and aggravated. I don’t. What goes around comes around. Every dog has his day.LIP: What would readers be surprised to learn about your personal life?JJ: I happen to be an introvert. I have to work up to being able to reach out and do my job. It’s an advantage in some sense. I find that being an introvert, while it’s more difficult for me to do certain things, I think that it may make me a little more thoughtful and attentive to people.last_img read more

Rossier dean to retire next June: ‘It is a time of change for the University’

first_img“You are fully committed to being change agents, who strive to improve your own lives, as well as the lives of your families and communities, now and in the future,” Gallagher told graduates in 2016. “Your success is a tribute to your hard work and dedication.” “I came to realize that retiring from the deanship does not, by any means, signal the end of my involvement in education, and change can present meaningful opportunity for our school,” Gallagher wrote in an email to colleagues Friday. Larry Picus, who serves as an associate dean at the school, said that during her tenure, Gallagher has transformed Rossier from “a very good regional school of education” into a “nationally and even internationally renowned school of education.” “You are fully committed to being change agents, who strive to improve your own lives, as well as the lives of your families and communities, now and in the future,” Gallagher told graduates in 2016. “Your success is a tribute to your hard work and dedication.” “The last 19 years as dean have been the most professionally and personally fulfilling in my career,” Gallagher wrote. “Together, we have set Rossier on a robust path of rigor, access and inclusivity. I am proud of our collective accomplishments, but it is a time of change for the University.” A Rossier spokesperson said the school has not yet announced a formal search process for Gallagher’s replacement but will prioritize receiving input from faculty, staff and students as it searches for its next leader. This article was updated on May 28 at 9:00 p.m. Larry Picus, who serves as an associate dean at the School, said that during her tenure, Gallagher has transformed the School from “a very good regional school of education” into a “nationally and even internationally renowned school of education.” During her tenure, Gallagher guided Rossier in climbing the national rankings for education schools in the country. In 2018, Rossier reached the top 10 of the U.S. News & World Report rankings, the highest ranking in its history. In the most recent rankings, the School was named No. 12. “I came to realize that retiring from the deanship does not, by any means, signal the end of my involvement in education, and change can present meaningful opportunity for our school,” Gallagher wrote in an email to colleagues May 24. During her tenure, Gallagher guided Rossier in climbing the national rankings for education schools in the country. In 2018, Rossier reached the top 10 of the U.S. News & World Report rankings, the highest ranking in its history. In the most recent rankings, the school was named No. 12. Gallagher led the Rossier team that initiated the USC Hybrid High School in 2012, the first of five charter public schools in Los Angeles started by Rossier during Gallagher’s tenure. Gallagher sits as the chair of Ednovate, Inc. which leads all five schools. Hybrid High’s first class graduated in 2016 with a 100 percent graduation rate. The graduation rate has remained at 100 percent since then. In 2013, Gallagher was the first to receive the Provost’s Prize for Innovation in Educational Practice. That same year, she was named a Pahara-Aspen Fellow and became the first dean of a school of education to be included as a fellow. The Pahara-Aspen Fellowship works to sustain and strengthen diverse leaders who reimagine public education.center_img A Rossier spokesperson said the School has not yet announced a formal search process for Gallagher’s replacement but will prioritize receiving input from faculty, staff and students as it searches for its next leader. “The last 19 years as dean have been the most professionally and personally fulfilling in my career,” Gallagher wrote. “Together, we have set Rossier on a robust path of rigor, access and inclusivity. I am proud of our collective accomplishments, but it is a time of change for the University.” Gallagher led the Rossier team that initiated the USC Hybrid High School in 2012, the first of five charter public schools in Los Angeles started by Rossier during Gallagher’s tenure. Gallagher sits as the chair of Ednovate, Inc. which leads all five schools. The Hybrid High’s first class graduated in 2016 with a 100 percent graduation rate. The graduation rate has remained at 100 percent since then. Rossier School of Education Dean Karen Gallagher will step down from her position and retire next June after serving as dean for 20 years. Gallagher joined other leaders in the education field to form Deans for Impact, an organization that aims to transform educator preparation. She also serves as chair of the board of directors for the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, the only teacher-accreditation organization in the country. In 2013, Gallagher was the first to receive the Provost’s Prize for Innovation in Educational Practice. That same year, she was named a Pahara-Aspen Fellow and became the first dean of a school of education to be included as a fellow. The Pahara-Aspen Fellowship works to sustain and strengthen diverse leaders who reimagine public education. Gallagher joined other leaders in the education field to form Deans for Impact, an organization that aims to transform educator preparation. She also serves as chair of the board of directors for the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, the only teacher accreditation organization in the country. “When she was appointed, we faced a very severe budget deficit. I would say we were in crisis,” said Picus, who has been a faculty member at Rossier for 30 years. “She came in and led [the School] through some planning efforts to improve our programs, to redevelop our relationship with school leaders throughout California … and help us get back on stable financial footing.” “I hope we’re able to find a leader as high caliber as Dean Gallagher has been in the past 20 years who will, as she has done, help us identify the new frontiers in education and help us remain as a leader in understanding what those frontiers are,” Picus said. “When she was appointed, we faced a very severe budget deficit. I would say we were in crisis,” said Picus, who has been a faculty member at Rossier for 30 years. “She came in and led [the school] through some planning efforts to improve our programs, to redevelop our relationship with school leaders throughout California … and help us get back on stable financial footing.” “I hope we’re able to find a leader as high caliber as Dean Gallagher has been in the past 20 years who will, as she has done, help us identify the new frontiers in education and help us remain as a leader in understanding what those frontiers are,” Picus said.last_img read more