Maria Sharapova appeals against two-year doping ban

first_imgFive-times grand slam champion Maria Sharapova is seeking to have her two-year doping ban wiped out or reduced as she lodged an appeal with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on Tuesday.”In her appeal to the CAS, Ms Sharapova seeks the annulment of the Tribunal’s decision to sanction her with a two-year period of ineligibility further to an anti-doping rule violation,” sport’s highest tribunal said in a statement.”Ms Sharapova submits that the period of ineligibility should be eliminated, or in the alternative, reduced.”RULING ON JULY 18The statement added that her case had been expedited and a ruling would be made by July 18 at the latest, which means Sharapova still harbours hopes of competing at the Rio Olympics in August provided her ban is reduced to time already served.The former world number one was named in Russia’s official entry list for the Olympics tennis tournament.Sharapova had called the ITF’s ruling “unfairly harsh” as an independent tribunal had found that she had not intentionally violated anti-doping rules.Meldonium was added to WADA’s list of banned substances at the start of the year after mounting evidence that it boosted blood flow and enhanced athletic performance.About 180 athletes have tested positive for the drug, manufactured in Latvia and common throughout eastern Europe, since January.Sharapova stunned the sporting world in March when she announced that she had tested positive for meldonium, a component of a product named Mildronate which she has taken since 2006 for health issues.last_img read more

New research reveals how gut bacteria and lipid metabolism may affect AD

first_imgJul 26 2018BIOCRATES’ Technology Enables Research of Host Microbiome Interactions to Investigate Neurodegenerative DiseasesBIOCRATES Life Sciences AG, a global leader in targeted metabolomics, reported today the Alzheimer’s Disease Metabolomics Consortium’s (ADMC) new breakthrough in Alzheimer’s research, which connects the Gut-Liver-Brain axis in the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). During the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC), Chicago, USA, researchers reported new data on how gut bacteria and lipid metabolism may influence AD.Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating and progressive neurological disorder that affects more than 60 million people worldwide. Despite major effort by researchers, the pathophysiology of this disease is not yet fully understood. However, this week in Chicago at the AAIC, scientists showed that changes in intestinal bacterial populations or activity is associated with cognitive and brain imaging changes and atrophy in Alzheimer’s disease and that this might apply to other neuropsychiatric diseases.Utilizing technology developed by BIOCRATES, which enables readouts of the host microbiome interaction, scientists shared their breakthrough findings that liver gut metabolic defects are correlated with cognitive decline in AD. Furthermore, these findings show that liver gut metabolic defects have an influence on the pathological features of AD, including neuroinflammation and amyloid-beta deposition.The Alzheimer Disease Metabolomics Consortium (ADMC) led by Prof. Rima Kaddurah-Daouk based at Duke University Medical Center is an international consortium of renowned academic institutes that includes BIOCRATES. The ADMC was formed as part of the NIA Accelerated Medicine Partnership in Alzheimer Disease (AMP-AD) to investigate pathogenic mechanisms in AD. The consortium is mapping metabolic failures across trajectory of Alzheimer’s disease and the contribution of human metabolism and the intestinal microbiota. Research carried out by Prof. Kaddurah-Daouk of the Duke Medical Center, indicate that the microbiome in our gut seems to play a major role in AD pathogenesis.Related StoriesStudy: Surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues to be core focus for healthcare facilitiesGetting rid of chronic infections by waking up sleeping bacteriaTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CT“BIOCRATES is excited to be a part of this important study. These findings underscore the importance of metabolism in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Results like these are only possible in large-scale collaborative research approaches, which our technology is perfectly suited to support,” commented Dr. Wulf Fischer-Knuppertz, CEO of BIOCRATES. “BIOCRATES continues to develop technologies for the better and deeper understanding of the host microbiome and its implications in the pathophysiology and progression of diseases such as Alzheimer’s.”In two separate AD studies with over 1,500 individuals, Prof. Rima Kaddurah-Daouk’s team showed that Alzheimer’s patients had lower levels of liver produced primary bile acids (BA) in their blood, while secondary bile acids, which are bacterially produced and known to be cytotoxic, have been found at higher concentrations. Prof. Kaddurah-Daouk was also the first to show that serum-based primary and secondary BA metabolites correlated with amyloid, tau and neurodegeneration biomarkers for AD: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, brain atrophy (measured by MRI), and glucose metabolism providing support for a role of BA pathways in AD pathophysiology.Prof. Kaddurah-Daouk of the Duke Psychiatry and Institute for Brain Sciences added: The new data suggests that the Gut-Liver-Brain axis seems to play a major role in the development of cognitive and brain atrophy in Alzheimer’s disease. Metabolomics might contribute to an earlier diagnosis of the disease and enable effective treatments based on peripheral influences to brain pathogenesis. This might help to find out whether available drugs might work better when applied early in the disease course.” Source:https://www.biocrates.com/2-features/197-gut-liver-brain-https:/www.biocrates.com/2-features/197-gut-liver-brain-axis-alzheimers-diseaseaxislast_img read more