QPR keeper Green unaware of Nottingham Forest interest

first_imgQPR’s Robert Green has told talkSPORT he is unaware of any interest in him from Nottingham Forest.Green has been linked with a move to the City Ground, with Forest reported to have targeted him after deciding to dispense with former R’s goalkeeper Lee Camp.But Green said: “This is the first I’ve heard about Nottingham Forest. I don’t know anything about it.”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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Van Schalkwyk for top UN job?

first_imgMarthinus van Schalkwyk and performersat the 2009 opening of the Nelson MandelaBay visitor information centre.(Image: Port Elizabeth Daily Photo) Van Schalkwyk addresses the delegatesat a climate change convention in Montreal.(Image: IISD) MEDIA CONTACTS • Vusi MonaPresidency, Head of Communications+27 82 047 2260.RELATED ARTICLES• Climate-friendly development• SA tourism outstrips world rates• Tourism remains strong in SA• Clean-up drive along SA bordersJanine ErasmusSouth Africa’s Presidency has put forward the country’s minister of tourism, Marthinus van Schalkwyk, as a candidate to head the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).The Presidency announced in March that after consideration, it had nominated Van Schalkwyk to take over from the outgoing executive secretary Yvo de Boer, who has been at the head of the organisation since 2006.Earlier in 2010 De Boer announced his retirement from the UN position to join consultancy giant KPMG as their global advisor on sustainability and climate. He will take up his new post on 1 July 2010.Van Schalkwyk is regarded as a strong contender for the position, having gained extensive experience in dealing with climate-related issues in his previous post as minister of environmental affairs and tourism.The Presidency reported that it had received requests from a number of outside parties – including governments, corporations and NGOs in both the developed and developing world – for Van Schalkwyk to be made available for nomination for this prestigious post.President Jacob Zuma and Van Schalkwyk have already met to discuss the matter.The final decision lies with UN secretary-general Ban Ki-Moon.A tough jobShould his bid be successful, the minister will face a tough job in getting the 192 members of the UNFCCC to agree on the effects of climate change and unite to implement strategies to counter the global phenomenon.In the wake of the 2009 climate conference held in Copenhagen, which failed to produce any realistic or legally binding emission-reduction target between participating nations, Van Schalkwyk will have his work cut out for him to bring the members of the UNFCCC into accord. De Boer is of the opinion that a new climate deal will not be struck before 2011.Van Schalkwyk will also have to restore the faith of developing nations, who also widely condemned the failure of the Copenhagen talks to provide any real hope of assistance for them from developed nations.However, as environmental affairs minister, a post which he held until after the general elections of 2009, Van Schalkwyk earned respect as a fighter for developing nations, and for leading South Africa in a number of progressive climate change initiatives that elevated the country as a champion for good environmental practices.Among his achievements are the implementation of a Black Economic Empowerment scorecard and charter for tourism, the launch of a new environmental protection fleet to counteract illegal fishing, the enforcing of the 2004 Air Quality Act, and the banning of the use, import and export, and manufacturing of asbestos and asbestos-containing materials.In 2008 he assumed the rotating presidency of the biennial African Ministerial Conference on the Environment, a gathering of African ministers of the environment, at its 12th session, which took place in Johannesburg.“Our message for this gathering is that we are ready to assist in shaping and building a cohesive African environmental agenda,” said Van Schalkwyk in his acceptance speech.He therefore has the understanding and the experience needed to effectively punt the needs of developing nations, ensuring they do not get pushed aside in the global climate debate.Towards the end of next year South Africa hosts the 2011 Conference of the Parties, an annual meeting of the members of the UNFCCC. To have a South African at the helm of global climate negotiations would be fitting, and, said the Presidency, “an honour and a privilege”.Saving the planetThe UNFCCC arose out of the 1992 UN environment summit, known as the Earth Summit, which took place in Rio de Janeiro. The treaty was established with the main aim of stabilising the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, and came into force in March 1994.The UNFCCC’s 192 parties are classified as Annex I or Annex II members. Annex I countries are seen as industrialised economies or economies in transition. Annex II countries have developed economies and are able to help developing countries financially with initiatives that fall under the UNFCCC.To date, 40 Annex I and 23 Annex II countries have become parties. There are also a number of non-Annex 1 parties, of which South Africa is one – these are mostly developing nations who are dependent on assistance from wealthier nations.The UNFCCC itself has no compulsory carbon emission limits to which members are expected to adhere, but its main instrument, the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, does set legally binding targets for carbon emission reduction for its own 184 members.The UNFCCC secretariat is based in Bonn, Germany.last_img read more

SA’s true colours show on Freedom Friday

first_img25 April 2014 Wearing South African regalia and waving national flags, hundreds of members of the public, including school learners, joined in celebrating the last Freedom Friday at the Rand Show in Johannesburg on Friday. Adorned in pins and badges of the South African flag, Joy Chauke said Freedom Fridays have been a great platform for mobilising South Africans to celebrate the road they have travelled since 1994. “We were able to rise above the worst towards a common future, and that is a milestone,” Chauke told SAnews at the event to mark the final Freedom Friday before the country’s celebration of Freedom Day on Sunday. “We have come far as a country, and the future has endless possibilities.” The campaign, which encouraged people to wear anything on Fridays that expressed their pride in being South African, ended with a bang at the Nasrec Expo Centre, with speakers recalling their stories of 27 April 1994 and South Africa’s subsequent journey. “Looking back 20 years ago, we had no clue what we were trying to build after the first elections, the journey had begun and still continues,” Phumla Williams, acting chief executive of the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) said. “Today South Africa is a better place to live in because of the sacrifices made.” Williams said the celebration of the country’s 20 years of freedom should continue all year. “But as South Africans we must not forget the support and the sacrifices our African brothers made for us during the struggle. We cannot celebrate our freedom without acknowledging their role.” Proudly South African CEO Leslie Sedibe said great strides had been made over the past 20 years, and that it was important for everyone to collectively celebrate, and vote in the upcoming election regardless of which political party one supported. Lead South Africa CEO Yusuf Abramjee used his address to call on citizens to practice their democratic right and vote on 7 May while continuing to share the South African story. South Africans can still mark Freedom Friday by sharing their thoughts, video clips, memories and pictures of freedom via Twitter (@20_yof) or Facebook (www.facebook.com/20yof). South Africans are also encouraged to show their pride, wear their colours, take a selfie and upload it to social media using the hashtag #FreedomFridaySelfie and/or #20YOFSelfie. Source: SAnews.govlast_img read more

Strong finish for 2016 meat exports

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest U.S. pork and beef exports wrapped up an excellent 2016 performance with very strong December results, according to statistics released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF).Pork export volume reached a record 2.31 million metric tons (mt) in 2016, up 8% year-over-year and 2% above the previous high in 2012. Export value increased 7% from a year ago to $5.94 billion. December pork exports totaled 222,635 mt, up 18% year-over-year, valued at $564.2 million, up 20%.Exports accounted for 25.8% of total 2016 pork production and 21.5% for muscle cuts — up from 24.2% and 20.8%, respectively, in 2015. December ratios were 28% for total production and 23% for muscle cuts only — up significantly from December 2015. Export value per head slaughtered averaged $50.20 in 2016, up 4% from the previous year. The December average was $56.06, up 24%.Beef exports increased 11% in volume (1.19 million mt) and 1% in value ($6.34 billion) from 2015. December exports totaled 116,847 mt, up 24% year-over-year. This was the largest monthly volume since July 2013 and the largest ever for December. Export value was $619.1 million in December, up 22%.Exports accounted for 13.7% of total beef production in 2016 and 10.5% for muscle cuts – up from 13.1% and 10%, respectively, in 2015. December exports accounted for 15.6% of total December beef production and 12.1% for muscle cuts only — each up more than 2%age points from a year ago and the highest since 2011. Export value per head of fed slaughter averaged $262.17, down 6% from 2015, but the December average was $301.97 – up 14% and the highest in nearly two years. Pork to Mexico sets fifth straight volume recordA remarkable second half pushed 2016 pork export volume to Mexico to its fifth consecutive record at 730,316 mt – breaking the previous record by 2%. Export value to Mexico totaled $1.36 billion, up 7% year-over-year and the second-highest on record, trailing only the $1.56 billion mark reached in 2014.“At this time of record-large pork production, it would be hard to overstate the importance of Mexican demand to the U.S. industry,” said Philip Seng, USMEF President and CEO. “This is especially true for hams, as we are locked out of Russia — once a large destination for U.S. hams — and China’s demand for imported hams has moderated in recent months. So now more than ever, we need strong demand from our key customers in Mexico, and they have responded with extraordinary results. December exports to Mexico accounted for nearly $16 per head, and that’s absolutely critical to the entire U.S. pork supply chain.”Though down from the high levels seen earlier in the year, December pork exports to China/Hong Kong were still up 40% year-over-year in volume (47,242 mt) and 42% higher in value ($96 million). For the full year, exports to China/Hong set a new volume record of 544,943 mt (up 61%) and broke the $1 billion mark for the first time ($1.07 billion, up 53%).Other 2016 highlights for U.S. pork exports include: Japan remained the leading value destination for U.S. pork, though exports fell 5% in volume (387,712 mt) and 2% in value ($1.56 billion) compared to 2015. However, chilled exports to Japan set a new record of 218,211 mt, up 8%.Led by a record performance in Central America and a fourth-quarter surge in Colombia and Chile, exports to the Central/South America region increased 11% in volume (135,954 mt) and 9% in value ($334.5 million).Pork shipments increased to both Australia and New Zealand, as export volume to Oceania reached 69,963 mt (up 10%) valued at $197.3 million (up 3%).Exports to the Dominican Republic set another record in 2016, topping the previous year’s totals by 10% in volume (25,591 mt) and 6% in value ($56.4 million).Fueled by increases in China/Hong Kong and Canada and steady exports to Mexico, pork variety meat exports jumped 20% in volume to 523,199 mt and 24% in value to $999 million – just short of the record levels reached in 2014. Asian markets drive strong beef export growthDriven by strong demand for higher-value chilled cuts, beef exports achieved new value records in South Korea and Taiwan in 2016, and rebounded strongly in Japan.In Korea, December beef exports soared by 81% in volume (20,333 mt) and 88% in value ($130 million) from a year ago, capping a remarkable year in which exports totaled 179,280 mt (up 42%) valued at $1.06 billion — up 31% from a year ago and breaking the previous value record by more than 20%. Korea’s per capita beef consumption set a new record in 2016 of 34 pounds (carcass weight) – so the U.S. not only gained market share, but also capitalized on the market’s overall growth.Beef exports to Taiwan were also strong in December, with export value ($43.3 million) hitting its highest level ever. Full-year exports to Taiwan were up 25% in volume to 44,053 mt and 14% in value to $362.8 million.2016 exports to Japan were the largest of the post-BSE era at 258,653 mt, up 26% year-over-year. Export value totaled $1.51 billion, up 18%. Chilled beef exports to Japan totaled 112,334 mt, up 44% from 2015.“In addition to the strength of the U.S. dollar, U.S. beef overcame other severe challenges in these north Asian markets and achieved remarkable results,” Seng said. “Despite facing higher tariff rates in Japan compared to Australian beef, U.S. beef displaced its competition and won back significant market share. And the investment the U.S. industry made to rebuild consumer confidence in Korea is paying tremendous dividends, especially in the retail sector. We’re seeing U.S. beef featured regularly by retailers who were once reluctant to carry the product.”Other 2016 highlights for U.S. beef included:Beef exports to Mexico increased 7% year-over-year in volume to 242,373 mt, though value fell 11% to $974.9 million. While challenged by a weak peso, Mexico remains a key destination for muscle cuts such as shoulder clods and rounds, as well as for beef variety meat.Led by strong growth in Chile and a doubling of exports to Colombia, beef exports to South America increased 6% in volume to 22,810 mt, valued at $92.7 million (down 2%). The region should see further growth in 2017 with the reopening of Brazil.Exports to Central America were up 7% in volume (12,745 mt) with top market Guatemala up 1% and exports to Honduras nearly doubling. Export value was $71.8 million, up 1%.Fueled by a resurgence in Indonesia and solid growth in Vietnam, beef exports to the ASEAN region were up 41% in volume (29,920 mt) and 15% in value ($156.9 million). Indonesia expanded access for U.S. beef in early August. Despite being closed to many products through the first seven months of the year, U.S. exports to Indonesia set a new value record of $39.4 million.Beef variety meat exports increased 10% in volume (341,433 mt) and 4% in value ($902.2 million) in 2016. Liver exports increased 12% to 81,727 and reached a broader range of markets. While liver exports to Egypt – the largest destination for U.S. livers – increased 4%, further growth was achieved in Central and South America and with the reopening of South Africa to U.S. beef. Lamb muscle cut exports continue upward trendAlthough U.S. lamb exports were down in 2016, this was largely due to a sharp decline in variety meat exports. While total exports fell 11% in volume (8,248 mt) and 4% in value ($18.4 million), muscle cut exports increased 26% (2,239 mt) and 16% ($12.3 million) respectively. Leading market Mexico followed a similar pattern, as variety meat exports declined significantly, but muscle cut exports increased 9% in volume (965 mt) and 1% in value ($2.8 million). Emerging markets showing promise in 2016 included Bermuda, the Philippines, Vietnam and the United Arab Emirates.last_img read more