Umphrey’s Brings The Shady Horns To Boston For An Epic Throwdown [Videos/Gallery/Setlist]

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee returned to the Blue Hills Bank Pavilion in Boston last night, and they brought The Shady Horns with them for a jam-packed show filled with lots of fun improvisation.The band kicked things off with a huge four-song movement, starting off with 2013 UMBowl instrumental “Gents”, before moving into old favorite “White Mans Moccasins”, followed up by a raging “Ringo”, before they landed on a high-energy “Miss Tinkles Overture”. Next up, Umphrey’s performed their multi-part fan-favorite “2×2”, featuring an incredible guitar solo from recent birthday boy Brendan Bayliss. The band then invited out featured guests Eric “Benny” Bloom and Ryan Zoidis, who brought the thunder with huge versions of “Speak Up”, “Headphones & Snowcones”, and “Example 1” to end set one with a serious bang.After a short break, Umphrey’s returned to the stage for a wild version of “Dump City”. The song is always well-received by fans, and delivered it’s usual healthy dose of improv – truly an excellent way to open up set two. “Cemetary Walk 1” followed, with Umphrey’s crushing the piano-driven, prog-rock song. The dancey “Day Nurse” followed, which eventually winded its way into a perfect version of their classic “Divisions”. After the huge “Divisions”, Umphrey’s picked the energy up even more with their metal rager “Wizard Burial Ground”. After the head-banging of “WBG”, the band invited The Shady Horns back out for a funky version of “I Got Love” before closing things out with the relative rarity of “Woman Wine & Song”.The band took their customary encore break, then returned to the stage for a pulsating version of “Bad Friday”, bringing the horns back out for one more high energy moment before bringing the evening to a close.Thanks to these Umphreaks, we can enjoy some fan-shot footage from the Boston takeover:Speak Up w/ The Shady Horns [via Kyle Miller] You can also stream the full audio from the show, courtesy of taper opsopcopolis, below:Umphrey’s McGee is at The Peach Music Festival next, playing an “After Midnight” set this evening. After such a hot show in Boston, one can only imagine the fireworks that fans will experience when they see a raging Umphrey’s late-night set at The Peach.Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee | Blue Hills Bank Pavilion | Boston, MA | 8/12/2016Set One: Gents > White Mans Moccasins > Ringo > Miss Tinkles Overture, 2×2, Speak Up, Headphones & Snowcones, Example 1Set Two: Dump City, Cemetary Walk 1, Day Nurse > Divisions, Wizard Burial Ground, I Got Love, Woman Wine & Song.Encore: Bad Friday[Photos by ATS Photography, see the full gallery below.] Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Leis show support for Te’o

first_imgAfter losing his grandmother and girlfriend within hours of each other last week, Irish linebacker Manti Te’o could have left Notre Dame and his teammates to be with his family in Hawaii. Instead, he stayed in South Bend and led his team to a decisive victory at Michigan State on Saturday. This Saturday, under the Notre Dame Stadium lights, tens of thousands of Fighting Irish fans will return the favor and display their support for Te’o during his time of loss by donning leis at the football team’s night game against Michigan. The “Wear a Lei for Manti” campaign was conceived at a Monday night meeting of the Leprechaun Legion when the student spirit group discussed the possibility of giving out leis to students at the pep rally before the Michigan game, senior and Legion football leader Rosemary Kelly said. “The idea was suggested at the Legion meeting in recognition of Manti’s allegiance to Notre Dame, his sacrifice to stay an extra year and his decision to play in the Michigan State game under personally difficult circumstances,” she said. “As students, we want to do our part and let him know that we value his contributions and support him as a man of Notre Dame, on and off the field.” Coincidentally, a similar idea was posted by someone unrelated to the Legion on the social media pages of The New ND Nation (TNNDN), a Notre Dame fan group committed to positive attitudes toward the school, within hours of the Legion’s meeting, Kelly said. Lynne Gilbert, a TNNDN volunteer who manages the group’s Twitter account, said the group helped publicize the idea via Twitter and Facebook on Monday. By Tuesday morning, a local South Bend radio station contacted Gilbert to discuss the lei campaign. “[The idea for the campaign] just blew up on Monday after we asked our Twitter followers what they thought of it,” she said. “We started a Facebook event page, ‘Wear a Lei for Manti,’ that now has 4,000 members, so it’s just been growing and growing.” The social media-driven publicity helped the Legion find a way to distribute leis to students without violating NCAA compliance rules about paying for promotional items in Te’o’s name, Kelly said. “We had to figure out how to pull it off without spending any money,” Kelly said. “Fortunately, a flurry of social media in the last few days has garnered support for the movement, and less than 24 hours after the idea surfaced, we had a donation for the pep rally, and we now have an opportunity to make the idea a reality.” Kelly said United Beverage Company of South Bend volunteered to donate 7,500 leis to the Legion to be distributed at Friday’s pep rally. At least 25,000 leis will be distributed Saturday from various sources, Gilbert said. Budweiser and WSBT have partnered to donate 10,000 leis for students on gameday, Brothers Bar and Grill will contribute 1,000 leis to the campaign and TNNDN purchased 500 leis with out-of-pocket money and donations received through its website. Gilbert said TNNDN’s goal in supporting the lei campaign was rooted in the group’s love for Notre Dame. “We really just want to give back to Manti and the whole team. Look what he’s done through adversity … just going out there and playing with his heart and putting it all on the field,” she said. “It’s a different atmosphere and the team is so unified, so anything we can do to give back to them, we want to do.” As a member of Notre Dame’s student community, Kelly said the movement holds even greater meaning. “Hopefully students will take a moment to think about what the lei means as they put it on. It is a sign of affection for Manti and a symbol of our support for him,” she said. “It is a nod toward what we, as a community, hold to be important in our representative student-athletes, and after this week, I think each student on campus will have a new awareness of just how tight-knit the Notre Dame community is and will realize that community does not end at campus boundaries.” For more information, visit TNNDN’s website, www.thenewndnation.com, and the Facebook pages of TNNDN and the Leprechaun Legion.last_img read more

Workshops Help People

first_imgIt seems perfect.* In south Georgia, many farmers look for a new moneymaking crop.* Around Atlanta, other workers look for career changes. (Often, layoffs force theissue.)* Meanwhile, greenhouse, nursery and landscape markets blossom.Thriving markets look made-to-order for people seeking promising business ventures.Between the people and the prospects, though, stands a stark reality: 85 percent of allnew businesses fail within the first five years.”That’s where we’re trying to help,” said Paul Thomas, a horticulturist withthe University of Georgia Extension Service.Extension specialists will lead a workshop March 20-22 in Athens. Along with the UGABusiness Outreach Services, Georgia Commercial Flower Growers Association and GeorgiaGreen Industry Association, they hope to help new ventures start out right.An early, hands-on workshop March 19 will teach how to grow plants from seeds orcuttings.The workshops will offer 43 sessions. Over four days, greenhouse and nursery owners,landscape pros and UGA experts will tell just about everything anybody needs to know aboutstarting these businesses.”Through our county Extension offices, hundreds of people have shown an interestin starting businesses like this,” Thomas said. “And there’s plenty of room fornew people in this market.”The market in the Southeast is the strongest we’ve ever seen,” Thomas said.”Sales have gone up 13 percent per year over the past three years. Growers are makingmoney. And production is nowhere near the market capacity.”It’s not just a few niches, either,” Thomas said. “It’s herbs, groundcovers, shrubs, vines, trees, cuttings, bedding plants, perennials — there are thousandsof niches.”Taken together, “green industry” firms sell Georgia’s seventh-largest farmproduct, with more than $200 million in yearly sales.”It’s the fastest-growing commodity in Georgia, running neck-and-neck withcotton,” Thomas said. “And it doesn’t take but an acre of ground to get intothis business.”The workshops March 19 and March 20-22 are designed to show people how to grow plants,how the industry works, what sells, how it sells and where it sells.The March 19 workshop requires pre-registration by March 15. A $150 fee coversequipment, supplies, books and plants. The first 40 to register may attend.The fee for the March 20-22 workshop is $125 before March 15. It’s $145 after that. Thefee covers refreshment breaks, two lunches and materials.To learn more about the workshops or get a registration form, contact the countyExtension office. Or call 1-800-884-1419 or (706) 542-2134.last_img read more