Minnesota student athlete battling rare disease

first_imgSteam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours LATEST STORIES Winfrey details her decision to withdraw from Simmons film MOST READ View comments Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations This photo aken Aug. 31, 2017, shows Byron quarterback Mike Coble (3) being greeted by fans while taking the field before a Southeast District game against Triton in Byron, Minn. (Joe Ahlquist/The Rochester Post-Bulletin via AP)BYRON, Minn. — A student athlete in three sports at a southeastern Minnesota high school is fighting a rare disease that causes his body’s immune system to attack the nervous system.Byron High School senior Mike Coble was been diagnosed this month with Guillain-Barre Syndrome, which affects only about 1 in 100,000 people, the Post Bulletin reported.ADVERTISEMENT Risk vs. reward: Porter Jr.’s NBA draft spot anyone’s guess Coble has experienced numbness in his hands, feet and face, as well as a severe rash. He had to be hospitalized at Mayo Clinic Hospital-Saint Mary’s because the symptoms got so severe.Friend and teammate Kaden Koski said Coble was experiencing breathing problems at one point, but he’s now more responsive. Coble can understand what people say, nodding or squeezing their hands in response, Koski said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownThere’s no cure for the disease, but most people recover, according to the Mayo Clinic. The recovery period will likely be long, Coble’s friends said.“That’s the hardest part, knowing that it’ll get worse before it gets better,” said Bjorn Knutson, one of Coble’s friends. “With there being no cure, it’s pretty much a time game.” Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displaced Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Weinstein rape trial Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls Coble’s friends, teammates and coaches have started a GoFundMe page to raise money to help cover his medical expenses. The group hopes to raise at least $20,000.“We want money to be the last worry,” Knutson said. “The community has really come together, not even just here but throughout the state.”Coble participates in football, basketball and track. He was slated to play football for Minnesota State University in the fall, but those plans have been put on hold.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more