SpaceX Crew Dragon Capsule Resilience, Carrying Four Astronauts, Docks With International Space Station

first_imgSunday night’s launch marked SpaceX’s first operational mission for NASA under that program, after a test flight last summer with a crew of two US astronauts.© Thomson Reuters 2020Will Apple Silicon Lead to Affordable MacBooks in India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. The space station, an orbital laboratory about 250 miles (400 km) above Earth, will be their home for the next six months. After that, another set of astronauts on a Crew Dragon capsule will replace them. That rotation will continue until Boeing joins the programme with its own spacecraft late next year.The Resilience crew includes Crew Dragon commander Mike Hopkins and two fellow NASA astronauts: mission pilot Victor Glover and physicist Shannon Walker. They are joined by Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi, making his third trip to space after previously flying on the US shuttle in 2005 and Soyuz in 2009.crew members spacex falcon 9 reuters crew– Advertisement – Four astronauts riding a newly designed spacecraft from Elon Musk’s SpaceX docked with the International Space Station Monday night, in the first crewed mission on a privately built space capsule purchased by NASA.SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule, dubbed Resilience by its crew of three Americans and one Japanese astronaut, docked at 11:01pm EST (9:31am Tuesday IST), 27 hours after launching atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla.- Advertisement – Another US astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts are aboard the space station from a previous mission.“Welcome to the ISS. We can’t wait to have you onboard,” said Kate Rubins, a US astronaut already on the space station.Before receiving its flight certification from NASA last week, SpaceX’s Crew Dragon had been under development for roughly a decade under a public-private NASA program started in 2011 to revive the agency’s human spaceflight capability.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Study finds greater, later role for antivirals in flu patients

first_img Frederick Hayden, MD, an antiviral expert with the World Health Organization, told the CP that the study’s findings on the benefits of later antiviral treatment were compelling. “It’s clear from this experience now that there seems to be a benefit, even with later treatment,” he said. The Toronto-based researchers reviewed medical data from 327 adults who were hospitalized for laboratory-confirmed influenza between January 2005 and May 2006 to explore how antiviral medications influenced the patients’ treatment outcome. The study was funded by a grant from Hoffman-La Roche, the maker of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu), but the authors state the company had no role in designing, conducting, or reporting the study. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classifies people aged 65 and older among the groups vulnerable to serious complications of influenza. In the United States each year, seasonal influenza is linked to about 200,000 hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths, according to a Nov 12 press release from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), which publishes CID. The researchers found that antiviral medications reduced the risk of death by 79% (odds ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.06 to 0.80). The treatment did not reduce the length of hospital stay, however. The standard advice about antiviral treatment for flu—based on previous studies involving relatively young, otherwise healthy adults—is that it must begin within 48 hours after onset of symptoms to be effective. But the new findings, published in the early online Dec 15 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases (CID), suggest the virus may behave differently in an older, sicker population, giving antiviral medications a role later in the illness course. Thirty-two percent (106) of the patients were prescribed antiviral drugs; three received amantadine and 103 got oseltamivir. Of the 100 patients for whom more detailed oseltamivir treatment data was available, 71 were treated starting more than 48 hours after their flu symptoms began. The finding that antiviral treatment begun more than 48 hours after symptom onset was beneficial for older patients does not contradict other findings that for otherwise healthy adults the drugs are effective only when given sooner, the researchers write. A robust immune response in healthy patients quickly clears the virus from the body, and late antiviral treatment isn’t helpful. “However, patients with severe immunocompromise may not control viral replication for many days, and little is known about the time course of viral load in older patients at risk of influenza complications,” the authors report. CDC information on seasonal influenzahttp://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease.htm They conclude that their findings support the use of antiviral medications in hospitalized patients, but McGeer, in the IDSA press release, said the drugs should be prescribed only when patients really need them. “As with antibiotics, there is a risk for selection for antiviral resistance, and it is important to use the medications only where there is a clear benefit,” she said. Anne Moscona, MD, an antiviral expert at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, said the CID study findings have the potential to change how physicians manage flu patients, according to a report today by the Canadian Press (CP). “I think this could be a real advance,” Moscona told the CP. CDC information on antiviral treatment for fluhttp://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals/index.htm McGeer A, Green KA, Pleveshi A, et al. Antiviral therapy and outcomes of influenza requiring hospitalization in Ontario, Canada. Clin Infect Dis 2007;45(15 Dec) [Full text] The authors of the CID study say the rates of disease they found varied by medical facility and that the number of lab-confirmed flu cases was lower than what they had expected for the number of hospital admissions and population size. Nov 14, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Adults who are hospitalized with serious seasonal influenza infections are more likely to survive if they receive antiviral medications, and older patients may benefit even if treatment is delayed until more than 48 hours after their first symptoms, according to a new study by Canadian researchers. More physicians should be testing for influenza and prescribing antiviral treatment when they find it in hospital patients, she said in the CP report. McGeere said her team’s findings don’t diminish the importance of flu vaccination. “Considerable morbidity and mortality due to influenza remain. We need—and people are working on—better vaccines,” McGeer said. “Until we get them, we can help people by diagnosing and treating disease.” “Influenza causing hospital admission is more common than most people think,” said the study’s lead author, Allison McGeer, MD, in the IDSA press release. “We will save lives if we recognize and appropriately treat influenza in patients being admitted to the hospital.” Among the study group, 75% (245) of patients had an underlying chronic illness and 71% (216) had received their annual their annual flu vaccine. The median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 15 to 98). Moscona told the CP, “If we test more, we’ll identify more, and people will get more antivirals as opposed to antibiotics.” See also:last_img read more

The Latest: Bach says rising virus figures led to postponing

first_imgMore AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 The International Olympic Committee along with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and local organizers have decided that the Tokyo Games cannot go ahead as scheduled this year because of the coronavirus outbreak.The IOC says the games will be held “not later than summer 2021” but they will still be called the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.___Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says IOC President Thomas Bach has agreed “100%” to his proposal of postponing the Tokyo Olympics for about one year until 2021 because of the coronavirus outbreak.Bach had previously said the IOC would make an announcement about postponing the 2020 Olympics in the next four weeks. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___IOC president Thomas Bach says “alarming figures” in the past few days about the coronavirus were key to deciding the Tokyo Olympics must be postponed. ___Japan’s NHK public television says Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will propose a one-year postponement for the Tokyo Olympics during talks with IOC President Thomas Bach.Abe says a postponement is unavoidable if the 2020 Games cannot be held in a complete manner amid the coronavirus pandemic.Abe held telephone talks with Bach after IOC said it would make a decision on the Tokyo Games over the next four weeks.___ Associated Press March 24, 2020 That brings an end to all professional football competitions in Australia and New Zealand.Football Federation Australia chief executive James Johnson says the latest measures imposed by the federal government made it impossible for the A-League to continue. The league had only a few regular-season games remaining before the playoffs. Johnson said the postponement will be reviewed on April 22.Johnson says “as a national competition played in all parts of Australia, as well as New Zealand, mission complicated became mission impossible.”Newcastle’s 2-1 win over Melbourne City at an empty stadium on Monday was the last game completed. Sydney FC leads the standings with 48 points after 20 games.___center_img Bach cites the World Health Organization “saying in the last couple of hours that Africa has to prepare for the worst.”The IOC has been advised by the WHO, which said Monday the pandemic is accelerating.Bach says the original health issue for hosting the Tokyo Olympics was “could Japan offer a safe welcome” and the IOC was confident it could.___The Tokyo Olympics have been officially postponed until 2021. The European club rugby finals in May have been suspended because of the coronavirus outbreak.Governing body European Professional Club Rugby announced the decision a day after a conference call by the board.The Champions Cup and second-tier Challenge Cup had already suspended the quarterfinals scheduled for next month. Now the semifinals on May 1-3 and the finals in Marseille set for May 22-23 are off.EPCR says it “remains committed to completing the 2019-20 Heineken Champions Cup and Challenge Cup season.”___ The Tokyo Olympic torch relay will start Thursday as planned in northeastern Fukushima prefecture but with no torch, no torchbearers and no public because of the coronavirus outbreak.There will be an Olympic flame carried in a lantern and transported by a vehicle along what organizers hope will be empty roadsides.The Tokyo Games and the relay have been caught in limbo since International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach said four weeks were needed to decide on an inevitable postponement of the planned opening on July 24. He has ruled out a cancellation.___Australian soccer’s A-League has suspended its season indefinitely because of the coronavirus outbreak. ___Taiwan’s professional baseball league has set April 11 as the revised date for opening day.The start of the Taiwan-based Chinese Professional Baseball League’s season has been delayed twice this month because of the coronavirus pandemic.The CPBL’s website says the opening game would go ahead in a closed stadium but there could be up to 150 season ticket holders allowed entry under strict social distancing guidelines if the government approves.Sports leagues across Asia have been postponed or suspended because of the virus outbreak. The professional baseball and soccer leagues in Japan are aiming to start or resume their seasons in late April. The Latest: Bach says rising virus figures led to postponinglast_img read more