FIFA postpones South American World Cup qualifiers over coronavirus

first_imgRelatedPosts Italy introduces compulsory virus testing for travellers from France Nigeria records new COVID-19 infections, more deaths as figures rise to 57,242 I was in best of forms before Tokyo Paralympics was postponed — Powerlifter Ejike World football governing body FIFA has postponed South American qualifying matches for the 2022 Qatar World Cup. This was after a request from the region’s football federation amid concerns over the spread of coronavirus. FIFA said in a letter to the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL), which the federation tweeted, that it would seek to reschedule the 10 matches. They were due to take place between March 23 and 31. A number of Latin America’s top football stars play for European teams in countries that have seen significant cases of the virus. They would have faced quarantines on their return to their home countries. FIFA Secretary General Fatma Samoura told her counterpart at CONMEBOL, Jose Astigarraga, that the health and safety of those involved in the World Cup was her primary concern. “We will continue to work with and consult you and your team to be able to find possible dates in which these matches can be played, something which will require… solutions that take into account the unique and fast-changing nature of this exceptional situation,” she wrote in the letter. Reuters/NAN.Tags: CONMEBOLCoronavirusFatma SamouraFIFAJose AstigarragaWorld Cuplast_img read more

FIFA bans ex-Afghan football boss for life over sexual assault

first_imgThe former president of the Afghanistan Football Federation has been given a lifetime ban after “sexually abusing” players in the women’s national team.Keramuddin Keram was also fined 1m Swiss Francs (£794,849) after the investigation carried out by world football’s governing body Fifa.An independent ethics committee said he was guilty of “abusing his position” as AFF president.Complaints lodged had accused him of “repeated” sexual abuse from 2013-18.Fifa said the allegations had been made by “at least” five Afghani players.In December, Keram was suspended from his post by Afghanistan’s attorney general’s office following allegations made by former players and Kelly Lindsey, the American former head coach of the team.At the time, the AFF called the allegations “groundless”. Source: BBClast_img read more

Peerless SC captures Calcutta Football League title as East Bengal grants walk over

first_imgAdvertisement 5fzdNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsq82Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E933h( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 4mWould you ever consider trying this?😱s4jCan your students do this? 🌚9oRoller skating! Powered by Firework Peerless SC are the Champions of Calcutta Football League Premier Division A in 2019. They have collected 23 points in 11 matches in the whole tournament. In the meantime, they defeated two Kolkata giants East Bengal and Mohun Bagan in the league. However, Md Sporting were able to beat Peerless SC in this season.Advertisement Today, East Bengal club management did not send their team to play the match against Customs at Kalyani. The match was supposed to be played on 29th September. However, it was not possible to play the match on that day because of poor ground condition. The match was scheduled at the home ground of East Bengal.Advertisement 29th September was the day where all the title decider matches were scheduled. Peerless SC won their respective match against George Telegraph by a margin of 2-0. Both the goals were scored by Kromah. East Bengal needed to win their last match against Customs by a margin of 7 goals. It was merely impossible and that’s why the club management of East Bengal decided to grant a walk over in the last match. They stated that their head coach Alejandro Garcia would be on leave. With this official announcement, Peerless SC won the Calcutta Football League this season.Barcelona officially announce Antonie Griezmann as their playerAdvertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Worst air in black areas

first_img President Clinton ordered the government in 1993 to ensure equality in protecting Americans from pollution, but more than a decade later, factory emissions still disproportionately place minorities and the poor at greater risk, the AP found. In 19 states, blacks were more than twice as likely as whites to live in neighborhoods where air pollution seems to pose the greatest health dangers, the analysis showed. Nearly half of Missouri’s black population, for example, and just over half of the blacks in Kansas live in the 10 percent of their states’ neighborhoods with the highest risk scores. Similarly, more than four of every 10 blacks in Kentucky, Minnesota, Oregon and Wisconsin live in high-risk neighborhoods. And while Hispanics and Asians aren’t overrepresented in high-risk neighborhoods nationally, in certain states they are. In Michigan, for example, 8.3 percent of the people living in high-risk areas are Hispanic, though Hispanics make up only 3.3 of the statewide population. The average income in the highest-risk neighborhoods was $18,806 when the Census Bureau last measured it, more than $3,000 less than the average for the rest of the nation. One of every six people in the high-risk areas lived in poverty, compared with one of eight elsewhere, the AP found. Unemployment was nearly 20 percent higher than the national average in the neighborhoods with the highest risk scores, while residents there were far less likely to have college degrees. Research over the past two decades has shown that short-term exposure to common air pollution worsens existing lung and heart disease and is linked to such diseases as asthma, bronchitis and cancer. Long-term exposure increases the risks. The Bush administration, which has tried to ease some Clean Air Act regulations, says its mission isn’t to alleviate pollution among specific racial or income groups but rather to protect all populations facing the highest risk. “We’re going to get at those folks to make sure that they are going to be breathing clean air, and that’s regardless of their race, creed or color,” Deputy EPA Administrator Marcus Peacock said. Peacock said industrial air pollution has declined significantly in the past 30 years as regulations and technology have improved. Since 1990, according to EPA, total annual emissions of 188 regulated toxins have declined by 36 percent. Still, Peacock acknowledged, “there are risks, and I would assume some unacceptable risks, posed by industrial air pollution in some parts of the country.” In Louisville, Ky., Renee Murphy blames smokestack emissions in the “Rubbertown” industrial strip near her home for the asthma attacks her five children suffer. Her neighborhood, which is 96 percent black, ranks among the nation’s areas at highest risk from factory pollution. “It’s hard to watch your children gasp for breath,” she said. The Murphy family lives just a few blocks from Zeon Chemicals, which released more than 25,000 pounds of a chemical called acrylonitrile into the air during 2000. The chemical is suspected of causing cancer, and the government has determined that it is much more toxic to children than adults. Tom Herman, corporate environmental manager at Zeon, said the plant is reducing its emissions and is talking with area residents concerned about air quality to show that “there are real people working here concerned for them as well as our own health.” Air pollution “works with many other factors, genetics and environment, to heighten one’s risk of developing asthma and chronic lung disease, and if you have it, it will make it worse,” said Dr. John Brofman, director of respiratory intensive care at MacNeal Hospital in the suburban Chicago town of Berwyn. “Evidence suggests that not only do people get hospitalized but they die at higher rates in areas with significant air pollution,” he said. Environmental experts say most pollution inequities result from historical land-use decisions and local development policies. Also, regulators too often focus on one plant or one pollutant without regard to the cumulative impact, they say. Citizens in high-risk neighborhoods have little legal recourse. They can file lawsuits under the 1964 Civil Rights Act but must prove intentional discrimination. And while some federal agencies ban environmental practices that result in discrimination, the Supreme Court says private citizens can’t sue to enforce those rules. Citizen complaints have had little effect. From 1993 through last summer, the EPA received 164 complaints alleging civil-rights violations in environmental decisions and investigated 47. Twenty-eight were dismissed; 19 are pending. “Any time our society says that a powerful chemical company has the same right as a low-income family that’s living next door, that playing field is not level, is not fair,” said Robert Bullard, director of the Environmental Justice Resource Center at Clark Atlanta University. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake The air in the neighborhood where Kevin played is among the least healthy in the country, according to a little-known government research project that assigns risk scores for industrial air pollution in every square kilometer of the United States. An Associated Press analysis of that data shows black Americans like the Browns are 79 percent more likely than whites to live in neighborhoods where industrial pollution is suspected of posing the greatest health danger. Residents in neighborhoods with the highest pollution scores also tend to be poorer, less educated and more often unemployed than those elsewhere in the country, the AP found. “Poor communities, frequently communities of color but not exclusively, suffer disproportionately,” said Carol Browner, who headed the Environmental Protection Agency during the Clinton administration when the scoring system was developed. “If you look at where our industrialized facilities tend to be located, they’re not in the upper-middle-class neighborhoods.” With help from government scientists, the AP mapped the risk scores for every neighborhood counted by the Census Bureau in 2000. The scores were then used to compare risks among neighborhoods and to study the racial and economic status of those who breathe America’s most unhealthy air. CHICAGO – Kevin Brown’s most feared opponent on the sandlot or basketball court while he was growing up wasn’t another kid. It was the polluted air he breathed. “I would look outside and I would see him just leaning on a tree or leaning over a pole, gasping, gasping, trying to get some breath so he could go back to playing,” recalls his mother, Lana Brown. Kevin suffered from asthma. His mother is convinced the factory air that covered their neighborhood triggered the attacks that sent them rushing to the emergency room week after week, his panic filling the car. “I can’t breathe! I have no air, I’m going to die!” last_img read more

Fake Darwinism Created by Intelligent Design

first_imgScientists have created enzymes with enhanced ability to select between left- and right-handed molecules, using an “evolutionary” process, claims Manfred Reetz in a Perspective article in PNAS:1A fundamentally new approach to asymmetric catalysis in organic chemistry is described based on the in vitro evolution of enantioselective enzymes. It comprises the appropriate combination of gene mutagenesis and expression coupled with an efficient high-throughput screening system for evaluating enantioselectivity (enantiomeric excess assay). Several such cycles lead to a “Darwinistic” process, which is independent of any knowledge concerning the structure or the mechanism of the enzyme being evolved. The challenge is to choose the optimal mutagenesis methods to navigate efficiently in protein sequence space. As a first example, the combination of error-prone mutagenesis, saturation mutagenesis, and DNA-shuffling led to a dramatic enhancement of enantioselectivity of a lipase acting as a catalyst in the kinetic resolution of a chiral ester. Mutations at positions remote from the catalytically active center were identified, a surprising finding, which was explained on the basis of a novel relay mechanism. The scope and limitations of the method are discussed, including the prospect of directed evolution of stereoselective hybrid catalysts composed of robust protein hosts in which transition metal centers have been implanted.Basically, researchers built enzymes top-down instead of bottom-up. Instead of the old “rational design” method, trying to construct an active site to perform the function needed, they started with the function they wanted, and iteratively selected any “mutants” that came closest to doing the job, without stipulating how they did it. The “surprising finding” he spoke of was that a distant mutation, far from the active site, actually improved the performance of the enzyme.1Manfred T. Reetz, “Controlling the enantioselectivity of enzymes by directed evolution: Practical and theoretical ramifications,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0306866101, published online before print April 12, 2004.He put “Darwinistic” in quotes, because it was not really Darwinistic, it was Designistic. The scientists played the role of designer by carefully selecting the results and directing the outcome. This paper, like others before it, gives two false impressions: (1) that Darwinism achieved the high specificity of proteins in the past, and (2) that Darwinian theory is a boon to science in the present. This is nothing but name-dropping. Charlie had nothing to do with it. If this were Darwinism, there would be no “directed evolution” (an oxymoron), because there would be no direction. Here, the scientists had a goal: they wanted enantioselective enzymes. Their “mutation and selection” process was results-driven by artificial selection, a form of intelligent design. Yet Reetz illogically claims, without any evidence or support (only belief), “Enzymes are products of evolution, and might therefore be expected to function with high enantioselectivity only with natural substrates under physiological conditions.” Then, in the very next breath, he falsifies this evolutionary prediction: “However, it is well known that this is not the case, because a surprisingly large number of unnatural compounds are converted with high enantioselectivity, even in organic solvents.” So does this convert him to ID theory? No, he just waltzes into the problem at hand: “Nevertheless, the problem of substrate specificity persists. In such cases several approaches to enhance enzyme stereoselectivity have been described, including site-specific mutagenesis based on theoretical considerations…” la te da, blah blah, and so on, and so forth, so we’ll design an enzyme with a creative method and give Charlie the glory. The difference between this method and the traditional bottom-up approach Reetz calls “rational design” can be compared to the difference between engineering and management. The engineer knows the physical laws and properties of the widget he is designing, and organizes the parts specifically toward the solution. The manager just says, “Build me a widget that flies.” An upper manager might devise a contest between engineers to see who can come up with the best design. All the manager cares about is the results: will it fly? He weeds out the losers and rewards the winners. The winner gets more resources to refine the design until an optimal design is produced. Even if the engineer uses trial and error and chance, given enough trials a working prototype will emerge as long as intelligence is directing the process toward a goal. In a similar way, these researchers did not need to know all the details of the structure of the enzyme they wanted to create; they just mutated ingredients and selected the few that worked, then iterated the process until the best design was filtered out of the pile. They managed the process rather than engineering it. Only Dilbert would nominate his manager for a Darwin award. Another thing. The “surprising” discovery Reetz made also argues against Darwinism. His team found that a remote amino acid, far from the active site, was essential to the function. He was so surprised by this he called it a paradigm-shifting finding: “This observation leads to a change in paradigm, because all previous attempts to influence enantioselectivity of an enzyme by using site-specific mutagenesis had focused on amino acid substitutions near the active center. Such protein engineering was designed to “carve” an appropriate chiral pocket at the active center, in line with Fischer’s “lock-and-key” hypothesis or modified versions such as Koshland’s induced fit. Later, he adds, “… our studies show that the long-standing dogma regarding the necessity of amino acid substitutions exclusively at the active site to influence enantioselectivity no longer holds.” What this means is that an enzyme is designed all the way through, not just at the active site. The “lock and key” fit of an enzyme to its substrate is amazing enough, but to think that distant amino acids actually affect the workings of the molecular machine calls into question the belief that proteins can be mutated at will, as long as they are far from the active site. This underscores the improbability of getting all the amino acids in the right order, as described in our online book, Evolution: Possible or Impossible? Let’s give credit where credit is due. This experiment is all about design. Calling this “Darwinistic” is like calling Boeing a manufacturer of tornados in junkyards.(Visited 44 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

President Zuma upbeat as he concludes WEF visit with meeting with global investors

first_imgFrom left, Minister in the Presidency Jeff Radebe, Minister of Trade and Industry Rob Davies, Minister of Finance Pravin Gordhan and South African President Jacob Zuma at the Business Interaction Group on South Africa on Friday 22 January, a session of the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. (Image: The Presidency)On Friday 22 January 2016 President Jacob Zuma and his delegation held a fruitful and successful interaction with global investors at the World Economic Forum in Davos.The President met with global CEOs and chairmen of multinational corporations during the Business Interaction Group on South Africa, an annual forum where the President and Ministers engage the international investors to discuss opportunities in the country and also to hear their views on improving the investment climate in the country.South Africa recognises the importance of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), which accounts for 42% of the country’s GDP. Inward FDI flows continue to grow in South Africa. A number of companies have expanded operations and engaged in new investments. South Africa is also an important source of FDI for the African continent.In his remarks, President Zuma welcomed the foreign direct investment flows into the country. He shared the country’s response to the depressed economic climate especially the Nine Point Plan to ignite growth. The plan includes agriculture and agro-processing, advanced beneficiation of mineral resources, higher impact industrial policy action plan, boosting small businesses, energy capacity increase, promoting FDI and developing a robust ocean economy, science and technology, water and sanitation and managing state-owned companies. The President added that the country was becoming a frontier for FDI on the green economy, ocean economy, oil and gas and others which provided new opportunities.He also briefed the investors on the establishment on an Inter-Ministerial Committee on Investments and the establishment of a one-stop interdepartmental clearing house to make it easier for companies to invest. “We will focus on among others, cutting the red tape significantly to address the concerns that the investors have been raising,’’ the President said.The President also briefed the BIG meeting on the efforts to improve education and skills development including the building of new universities, training colleges and the building and refurbishment of schools.The investors sought information and also commented on various areas including energy, oil and gas, scrap metal industry, ocean economy, mineral beneficiation, human settlements and its importance in building social stability, regional integration, the need to stabilise growth and set expenditure ceilings.The prudent financial management of the country was addressed strongly by the President and the Ministers with an added emphasis on the country’s robust monetary policy framework. It was acknowledged that South Africa has a good fiscal framework.The global CEOs emphasised the need to ensure that policies are implemented and that there is certainty at all times.The need for predictability was also raised in the context of the recent changes of finance ministers and the impact thereof. The President responded that while governments all over the world are entitled to change Ministers, South Africa had responded without delay when concern was raised especially given the economic climate. The meeting appreciated the swift changes that were made afterwards resulting in the appointment of Minister Pravin Gordhan as the Minister of Finance.President Zuma welcomed the participation of the private sector in building the economy. He also assured the business community that South Africa’s economy is resilient, that the country has a strong and vibrant democracy with an active and vocal citizenry and vibrant media all of which acts as good checks and balances to the leadership in the country.“The BIG meeting has been extremely helpful. We appreciate all the constructive comments and suggestions on all areas from the economy to social development. The positive contribution of the international and domestic business community in such a negative economic climate is very encouraging. This has given us good feedback as we prepare for the State of the Nation Address and Budget next month,’’ said the President.The President said he was generally upbeat about the visit to Davos.“We are very happy with the visit. It has definitely been worthwhile. Team South Africa has done extremely well in Davos, marketing the country in a difficult and very competitive economic climate. We managed to put our message across effectively and received a positive hearing. There is a lot that we need to do and we are already working on many of the issues that the global business community has been raising. Team South Africa will meet at home to discuss all these matters further so that we can work together to build our country and take it forward’’ said the President.Enquiries: Bongani Majola on 082 339 1993 or [email protected] by: The PresidencyPretoriawww.thepresidency.gov.zalast_img read more

Cattlemen launch media campaign for comprehensive tax reform

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association kicked off a media and advertising campaign that will shine a spotlight on how various federal tax provisions impact America’s cattle and beef producers. The campaign, which will focus heavily on the death tax, aims to build support in Washington for comprehensive tax reform that makes our tax code fair for agricultural producers. The campaign will be centered around a new website, CattlemenForTaxReform.com, and will run through September.“We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to enact truly comprehensive tax reform, and we can’t afford to let this opportunity pass or to get it wrong,” said Craig Uden, NCBA President and Nebraska cattleman. “Family ranchers and farmers deserve a full and permanent repeal of the onerous death tax, which charges them in cash on the often-inflated appraised value of their property and equipment. This campaign will shine a spotlight on the stories of real ranchers who have had to deal with this issue, and it will also highlight current tax provisions that we need to maintain, such as stepped-up basis, cash accounting, and deducibility of interest payments.”In addition to the launch of the new website, the campaign kicked off with a two-minute video that will be heavily promoted on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms. The campaign’s first video features fifth-generation California rancher Kevin Kester, whose family struggled for a decade to pay a large death-tax bill after his grandfather passed away. With the specter of the death tax still looming, Kevin is forced to spend precious time and energy — not to mention thousands of dollars — planning for how to pass the ranch on to his children and grandchildren.“Without a doubt the biggest challenge that keeps me up at night is trying to figure out how to pass the ranching operation — our family operation on to the next generation,” Kester said in the video as he drives across his Bear Valley Ranch near Parkfield, Calif. “The current tax code is…leading toward more fragmentation of farms and ranches, which is not good for the environment or our ranchers and farmers.”Over the coming weeks, NCBA will roll out several other promoted videos and infographics featuring profiles of ranchers and other members of the cattle-production community. The products will enable American cattlemen and women to share their priorities for tax reform in their own words. The campaign will also connect grassroots ranchers and producers with their elected officials on Capitol Hill as tax-reform legislation is considered this autumn.“There’s a lot of misinformation out there on the tax debate — especially when it comes to who’s affected by the death tax,” Uden said. “This campaign will educate elected officials, the media, and the general public about how the tax code affects our American farmers and ranchers, who literally feed the world.”last_img read more

New country souvenir, Costa Rica, with Geocache of the Week: Rainbow Valley Cache

first_img SharePrint RelatedNew country souvenir, Cuba, with Geocache of the Week: Virtual Reward – FusterlandiaAugust 21, 2019In “community”It’s time to get stealthy. – Atomium – stealth challenge (Expo58) (GC1EG4C) – Geocache of the WeekDecember 11, 2014In “Geocache of the Week”New country souvenir, United Arab Emirates, with Geocache of the Week: Burj Khalifa a Virtual RewardNovember 20, 2019In “Community” TraditionalGC221QZby Wolf64 + Mikkky Difficulty:1.5Terrain:1.5 Today we release a new country/regional souvenir for Costa Rica! If you have found a geocache in Costa Rica, you automatically receive the souvenir on your profile.Costa Rica is often said to be one of the happiest countries in the world. Known for their outstanding democracy and quality of life, Costa Ricans are often said to live the Pura Vida, literally “pure life.” Though it might be a tiny country, it has a mighty amount of flora and fauna. It represents about 5 percent of the world’s biodiversity. The Monteverde cloud forest alone hosts over 100 species of mammals, 400 species of birds, 2,500 species of plants—and of course, one Geocache of the Week!It’s easy to see how our Geocache of the Week earned its name! Image by goldeneagles.Rainbow Valley Cache is an unassuming hide, located at the edge of the Cloud Forest. IT’s a classic container with room for plenty of swag that will leave both you and any young geocacher you bring with smiles upon your logs and your faces. The logs don’t lie! It certainly is a beautiful view. Image by 2010august.Take a hike over a vibrant blue suspension bridge or celebrate your find with a cool drink in a treehouse bar as you explore the astounding surroundings.Adventure is out there! Image by 2010August.And of course, check out the wildlife teeming in the area. A monkey and a coati—a small sampling of the animals you’ll discover en route to this cache. Images by CanadianRockies.Speaking of wildlife, when you find the cache, don’t forget to camouflage it appropriately or, as the cache page warns, the “monkeys will steal it!”Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.Share with your Friends:More Location:Costa RicaN 10° 18.566′ W 084° 49.728′last_img read more

Three tidbits from Urban Meyers Monday Ohio State press conference

OSU coach Urban Meyer speaks at a press conference on April 11. Credit: Ashley Nelson | Social Media EditorSpring camp is nearing its end for the Ohio State football team, as the Buckeyes have just three practices left on the schedule, including the annual spring game, which is set for Saturday at 1:30 p.m. OSU coach Urban Meyer spoke to the media on Monday after the team’s workout, and here are three of the most important things he addressed. Rule changes Meyer has never been one to mince words about rules he feels are unjust in college football, notably blasting the NCAA and College Football Playoff two seasons ago for not helping defray travel expenses for players’ families trying to attend the bowl games. His advocacy was instrumental in getting the NCAA to help fund a program. The three-time national champion coach was at it again Monday, chastising a pair of recent rule changes that he said are bad for student-athletes. The Division I Council ruled Friday to end limits on electronic communication and to forbid programs from hosting satellite camps. Satellite camps, which have increased in popularity in the last year, are when coaches appear as guests at schools in the South, or other areas laden with prospective recruits. OSU’s staff worked with Florida Atlantic at a camp in Florida in June. Meyer said his frustration with the decision on satellite camps will have a negative impact on lesser-known recruits and smaller programs. Because players have to pay for camps on their own dime, the rule change could stop a player from Mississippi, for instance, from traveling to Columbus for a camp put on by OSU. But if Meyer and his staff were guests at a camp in South, it would be easier for said player to attend. The same logic applies to smaller schools that work in conjunction in powerhouse programs. Since the rule mandates FBS schools host clinics and camps at their own facilities, Meyer said it hurts staffs at schools like Bowling Green in the Mid-American Conference, which before could have partnered with Meyer at an OSU camp. Now as a result, a lesser-valued recruit might not get the necessary exposure to have MAC schools offer scholarships. Meyer said he thinks “probably hundreds of scholarships have come out of (Columbus)” to those nonblue-chip recruits. “I hope they revisit it,” he said, adding, “Think about the student-athlete first.” The coach took an even harder stance on the lift of texting regulations, which, in theory, could mean coaches could constantly bombard recruits with text messages.“That’s the most ignorant thing I’ve ever heard,” Meyer said. “If they’re making a decision because coaches are upset about it, that’s not the point here … do you really want text messages from a hundred universities on your phone when you come out of school?” Committees making these decisions should be consulting the student-athletes before making some changes, Meyer said. “I think we learned our lesson on the (family travel expenses),” Meyer said. “Whoever has that checklist, No. 1: student-athlete.” Making a markMeyer offered high praise about four early enrollees from the 2016 recruiting class: wide receiver Austin Mack, running back Antonio Williams, offensive tackle Michael Jordan and defensive end Jonathan Cooper.“They’re much more than we ever thought they would be,” Meyer said. “Because you never know what you get. Sometimes high school coaches and people tell you, ‘They’re the greatest people in the world,’ then they get here and they’re not … But those kids are doing great.” The coach’s praise stems from the recruits’ efforts beyond just the practice field. Meyer said they are excelling in the classroom, with GPAs above 3.0. “They do everything right,” Meyer said.Still talking about quarterbacks? Redshirt junior J.T. Barrett is obviously the guy behind center this year for the Buckeyes, but there is still chatter about the other quarterbacks on the roster, namely about who will be Barrett’s backup. Meyer said redshirt freshman Joe Burrow, after improving his release “night and day,” is “close” to being game ready. Burrow is also becoming a “much better runner,” Meyer said. During the spring game on Saturday, Meyer said Burrow and redshirt sophomore Stephen Collier will play live a little bit, meaning contact, at least for some snaps, will not be off-limits. Barrett, on the other hand, will wear a black jersey, although how much he plays is still up in the air, Meyer said. read more

Ohio State club tennis tournament delayed due to Hurricane Matthew

Ohio State club tennis Scarlet Team tournament delayed due to Hurricane Matthew. Credit: OSU club tennisThe Ohio State club tennis team was originally scheduled to travel to Hilton Head Island, S.C. for the United States Tennis Association Tennis On Campus Fall Invitational this weekend, but concerns over the proximity of Hurricane Matthew have delayed the event until Oct. 28-30.The delay has caused a few changes for the team and vice president Sigrid Schoerner has acknowledged that the delay affects the state of the team.“Because it’s been moved, our roster is currently under construction,” Schoerner said. “Some people were going to be able to go this weekend, but then some of them can’t go during the week we’ve been moved to.”Despite the roster shake-up, Schoerner is confident that the team will be ready to compete.“We were prepared to go this weekend, but this just means that we have more time,” Schoerner said. “If it had been moved to next weekend, that would have been one thing. I just think that it’s been (moved) pretty far ahead (and) it gives us time to practice with the whole new group of people and get them ready to go.”This invitational is quite exclusive, allowing only 48 intramural and club tennis teams to compete. Alongside OSU, only two other schools from the Big Ten will be represented at the event. The Wisconsin Badgers will be sending their club team, as will the Maryland Terrapins. Scarlet Team Fundraising Chairwoman Isabelle Nejedlik believes that it is an honor for the team to be invited to the tournament given its limited number of entrants.“It means a lot to our team to be invited to some of the bigger events in the country,” Nejedlik said. “Ohio State prides itself on its tennis and since we have such a good varsity team, they are one of the best in the country, both men’s and women’s, we always have expectations to have a really good club team as well.”The reward for winning the upcoming tournament is huge for the teams, with first and second place receiving automatic bids for the 2017 USTA Tennis On Campus National Championship in Orlando, Florida, in April of 2017.With such high stakes on the line, Nejedlik believes that the talent and preparation on her team can help them advance to nationals.“We have pretty intense tryouts at the beginning of the season,” Nejedlik said. “Most of the girls currently on our top team were former college tennis players but transferred here. So the level every year has gotten higher and higher.” read more