Lettuce Announces Daily Schedule And Themes For Inaugural Fool’s Paradise

first_imgWe’re almost two weeks away from the Lettuce-hosted inaugural Fool’s Paradise, going down at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre in St. Augustine, FL on April 1 & 2. The daily schedules are finally here, equipped with set times, artist-led excursions, and daily themes. Break out your most tropical wear for Friday’s “Beach Babes & Bums” party, and get nautical or tap into your inner jokester for Saturday’s “Pirates & Pranksters” theme.Check out the daily schedules below, with more details to follow:Friday, April 1stSaturday, April 2The beach-town funk extravaganza features two explosive sets from New York funk masters Lettuce & Friends, along with: electro soul future-funk producer/saxophonist GRiZ; rising retro-soul stars Vulfpeck, and Chris Robinson’s Soul Revue ft. George Porter Jr. (The Meters), Ivan Neville (Dumpstaphunk), Nikki Glaspie (The Nth Power), Eric Krasno (Lettuce/Soulive), Neal Casal (Chris Robinson Brotherhood) & The Shady Horns. GRiZ and Lettuce have announced a special live band collaboration. Supporting acts include South Africa’s organic live house duo Goldfish and the progressive soul, R&B and gospel of The Nth Power, Brasstracks andMarvel Years. With Snarky Puppy’s Cory Henry as an Artist-At-Large, you’ll never know what to expect! Tickets here.In addition, a number of late night shows will be hosted by some of the most talented musicians in the industry! This includes Break Science, Vulfpeck, Goldfish and a very special performance by the Fools of Funk, featuring Adam Deitch, Adam Smirnoff, Cory Henry, Nigel Hall, Weedie Braimah, Eric “Benny” Bloom, and Ryan Zoidis. Late Night shows will take place at Elk’s Lodge after the Amphitheatre festivities are over. More information and a very limited supply of tickets can be found here. There’s more to look forward to than just musical adventures. Fool’s Paradise is also offering exciting Florida excursions with your favorite artists! Whether it’s mini-golf with Lettuce’s Eric Krasno and Jesus Coomes, crocodile crossing and zip-lining adventure with Break Science’s Borahm Lee, or a sailing escapade with Ryan Zoidis and Eric “Benny” Bloom, you’ll be rocking your Saturday alongside the best. More information and tickets can be found here.With so much to choose from, St. Augustine will be crawling with adventurous opportunities. The oldest city in the United States and fabled home to the Fountain of Youth, St. Augustine’s unique scenery and historical presence sets the city apart from any other in the country. With over 42 miles of beaches, incredible restaurants and bars, jetskiing, kayaking, fort tours, parasailing, and its own distillery, attendees will have plenty to explore. We can’t wait for Fool’s Paradise! All the information you need about the festival can be found on the official website.last_img read more

Get Psyched For Fool’s Paradise With These Pump-Up Playlists

first_imgOn April 1 & 2, 2016, Lettuce, Purple Hat Productions, and Live for Live Music will host Fool’s Paradise, a funk-fueled destination beach event taking place in the heart of one of America’s most historic cities: St. Augustine, FL. For all the Funk Fools getting ready to meet us in St. Augustine, we’ve put together two playlists for your listening pleasures.Whether you’re sitting at a desk, driving down the highway, or en route to the festival itself, these tunes will surely help make the wait well worth the while. We’ve separated the playlist between two days, as to account for the uniquely diverse vibes expected from each day’s respective lineups. Friday’s playlist features the thundering funkitudes of Lettuce, GRiZ, Break Science, Goldfish, Marvel Years, and more. Take it for a spin:Saturday’s playlist features the undeniable soul drenching sounds of Lettuce, Vulfpeck, Chris Robinson, The Meters, Dumpstaphunk, The Nth Power, Neal Casal’s Circles Around The Sun, Brasstracks, and more. Get lost here:In case the sounds aren’t enough to get you excited, here are ten more reasons why you should attend Fool’s Paradise. Peep the full schedule below!last_img read more

A Funky Conversation With The Pimps Of Joytime On Music, Brooklyn & More

first_imgThe Pimps of Joytime have found an audience thirsty for their brand of New Orleans-infused funk well beyond the bounds of their Brooklyn roots.They’ve already been busy on the festival circuit. This spring, they’ve taken their tunes to JazzFest down south and Lightning in a Bottle and BottleRock out West. Later this summer, you’ll find the Pimps promoting their new album, Jukestone Paradise, at the Deaf Camp Benefit in Snowmass Village, Colorado on July 16 and FloydFest in Floyd, Virginia on July 27, in addition to a slew of other dates in Washington, D.C., Colorado, New Jersey and Pennsylvania along the way.Live For Live Music had a chance to catch up with three of the pimps—lead singer and guitarist Brian J, percussionist and vocalist Mayteana Morales and vocalist Kim Dawson — before their set at BottleRock in Napa, California to talk about the band’s origins, how they fuse different styles together, the challenges of making money in music today and more!L4LM: Where did the name “Pimps of Joytime” come from?Brian J: When I was making my first record, I hit up a friend of mine to write a little piece, a little spoken-word piece, for this track. On some of the stuff they wrote was “Pimp of Joytime”. When I saw it, I just figured “That’s the name of the band.”L4LM: That was how long ago?Brian J: Ten years ago.L4LM: In those 10 years, do you feel the name has adapted well to you or that you have adapted well to the name? Does it fit? Has it fit you well?Brian: Well, I think we all have a different answer. My answer is yes, for the most part. People see the name and they’re like “Ooh, that sounds fun.” Here and there, some people can be offended about it, or if it’s some type of government-sponsored gig, it could potentially rub certain people the wrong way with that. But I’ve enjoyed it.L4LM: How did you all come together?Brian: Well, it’s an evolving…it’s evolved. It started as one thing and, over the years…I started working with May within the first year of the band. And then Dave [David Bailis, on the bass, keys and sampler], maybe six years, five years ago. Dave, maybe even six years. Then John [Staten, the drummer], maybe four years and Kim…Kim Dawson: This is my one-year anniversary this weekend.L4LM: Congratulations!Kim: My first gig with the band was Memorial Day weekend last year. Let’s get some more wine!L4LM: I guess that’s sort of the industry, to have to bring in new members.Kim: It’s very common for bands that have been around for 10 years, 10-plus years, to have evolutions, different rotations of members. Sometimes, people come back. Sometimes…you know. Everybody’s trying to do what’s best for the band. Everybody’s trying to do what’s best for themselves as individual musicians. But I feel like everybody right now in Pimps of Joytime is pretty happy with what we have. The sound is good, we get along.L4LM: Good chemistry.Kim: Yeah, it’s good chemistry, for sure. And especially because we all come from kind of different backgrounds as far as our musical education and professional experiences in music, whether it’s gospel for some of us or it’s like Afrobeat for some of us, whether it’s rock for some. I think that contributes to the sound because we all bring a little bit of that.Mayteana: Well, the music itself, it already started as a really diverse sound, so for us to come from those different backgrounds, we all found a place. I love all kinds of music and I think everyone in the band does. It works for all of us in terms of taste, too. I think we do find joy in being able to play such diverse kinds of music.L4LM: Do you feel like it’s more common nowadays for bands to be more eclectic in the way they bring together all different types of music? Or is it almost less genre-defined now than it used to be?Mayteana: I think it depends on what kind of scene you’re in. I think in the jam band scene there definitely is more variety in one set, you know, just because everybody has different influences.Kim: I think the industry, too, has changed. There is more acceptance in the mainstream if you have…it’d be like, “Okay, this is rock and this is what our definition of rock is and that’s all we play.” But I don’t think it’s ever been true that musicians have only been interested in or been influenced by one style of music. I don’t care who you are, whether you’re the Rolling Stones or whoever. I think everybody always has lots of things they listen to, and now I think in the industry, change is more common to be allowing all of these different sounds into your overall sound.L4LM: How do you guys go about incorporating so many different musical elements into one cohesive whole? What I’m asking about the songwriting process more than anything, more than anything.Brian: It happens really naturally and organically. I even have to try to be disciplined to make it a little…it can be too crazy sometimes. You’ve got to keep it focused. That’s always been a challenge for me is, it’s great to have a lot of influences, but you always want it to be cohesive. So that’s sort of been the challenge.Mayteana: Yeah, I remember when you wanted to incorporate polka and it just got vetoed.Kim: Everyone’s like, “Nope!”Brian: It was too much, that waltz base.Mayteana: Little polka dots.L4LM: What’s the genre of music that you were able to incorporate that most surprised you by the extent to which it worked?Brian: Well, I think in putting the original, first record together, I was experimenting like wildly with different styles. The funk groove, the foundation being groove sort of rose to the top as like, “This seems fun” when I was thinking about what kind of show do I really want to play? I decided to make it fun.L4LM: And you guys have ridden that since then, more or less?Brian: Yeah, yeah. I mean, it’s gone a little more rock, a little more blues. But certainly the heavy, rhythmic influence, like the really groove foundation thing, has really stayed.Mayteana: I don’t think there’s ever been a genre you’ve drawn from that has been so left field and it ended up working. I think everything that you’ve pulled from, it just naturally fit in, you know what I mean?Brian: That sounds good.L4LM: How do you feel you guys fit into the festival atmosphere? Because this is a pretty eclectic environment to be in, with so many different artists coming through. Do you feel at home in an atmosphere like this?Brian: I do, yeah. It’s just, you’re getting people where they’re really receptive. They want to have fun, and it’s like, “Oh, this is our perfect audience person.” They’re like out, they’re like “I want to have fun!” And we’re like, “WE want to have fun!” It’s a perfect combination.L4LM: I’m sure you guys have had some gigs where the crowd hasn’t been all that receptive, maybe the mood has been more tense.Brian: We’re familiar with it, yeah.Kim: I think most musicians have that, I don’t care what level you’re at even. Sometimes, you’re like, “Okay cool. Here’s where we are. I see. Cool.” It’s just part of the job.L4LM: What do you take away from experiences like that?Brian: Well, you have to work harder. That’s when it’s like, you keep working, you don’t give up. I’m really into comedy. It’s like these comedians. They have to keep working and finding a way to loosen up the crowd and get them laughing. That’s essentially what we do, but on a musical dance level.L4LM: It’s almost like finding your voice as a band, like you have to find something you can connect with audience on a certain level. They can get you, they can feel you.Brian: Well, we have a lot of built-in devices in our set, like things that’s like, “Okay, this works on people.” Sometimes, it works better than others.L4LM: Any examples of what those are?Brian: Arrangement things, vocal…just pretty much what we do. We construct a moment, like “Okay, we’re going to build this up and then we’re going to break it down.” When it works, people get really excited.Mayteana: It can be really challenging to play for an audience that’s very mellow. So, in those situaitons, it can be easy to not give as much energy back, as a show where an audience is going nuts. So I think the important, at least personally, I try to refmember to connect to the music and go from there, because that’s first and foremost. You can’t go off of someone sitting there watching you with a serious face, you know? It’s just like, “Hey [clap], I’m going to do this anyway!”Brian: That’s a good answer.Kim: You can’t get psyched out by whatever their mood is, if you’re feeling ready to party and they’re like “I’m chilling.”L4LM: You’ve got to hope they come along with you.Kim: Well, you just do what you do regardless.Mayteana: 100 percent.Kim: You have to do what you have to do and mean it and be authentic, authentically yourself. And eventually, people respond to that. People respond to when you are authentic. I think that, like you said, we connect to the music and we connect with each other and we’re just ourselves.Brian: But that’s a real challenge. Like, if you’re there and the audience, they’re just like dull. Sometimes we have gigs like that where like, for me, I’ll really connect to the music and I just completely don’t give a fuck. I’m having a great time, my eyes are closed, I’m just going for it. But then, when you don’t connect, you’re really having trouble connecting musically for the sound or your mood or whatever, those are the most challenging nights.Kim: Like you said, it’s work. You’re working harder. Not that we don’t ever, you know, put ourselves out there. It’s just like, there’s definitely a different energy level when you’re having to be like, “Okay! I’m going to make you dance!”L4LM: You have to give them more energy for them to then reciprocate.Kim: Yeah, and that’s always the balance that you’re working with on stage, reciprocating energy and then your own energy. It’s like this dance that you’re doing the whole time with the audience. But…Brian: I hope you’re not going to write this whole answer, the longest fucking answer to one question ever.Kim: It’s like 20 minutes.L4LM: It’s interesting to me! I don’t care.Brian: “This article is about what happens when the crowd isn’t feeling it and you’ve got to try to make it happen.”L4LM: I think it’s interesting, though, because jam music is so crowd-oriented.Brian: Well, we’re not actually a jam band.Kim: Yeah.L4LM: But you do jam sometimes.Brian: We do some jamming, but we write songs and we sing and we have harmonies and structure.Mayteana: It’s pretty structured. We have cues and a lot of sections.Kim: I would say…you mean like when we’re with crowds that are more of the jam orientation, festivals that are more jam-oriented.L4LM: Is it important at some level to read a crowd? Do you try to read a crowd?Brian: I think there’s a combination. You read them. Dave makes the set lists. That does structure the energy flow of the set. You read them, but I think regardless, you’re just going to put a lot of energy out there.Mayteana: I think it can go too far either way. You can’t go by just what the audience is feeling because we also have this thing we do. There’s a balance.L4LM: You guys are Brooklyn-based. Are any of you from Brooklyn? Did you meet in Brooklyn?Brian: Well, I met May in Brooklyn during the genesis, the early genesis of the band. And Dave also is from Brooklyn. And then I imported Kim and John from out of state.Kim: We were the imports, yes.L4LM: Where were you imported from?Kim: I’m imported from Denver. John is imported from San Diego.L4LM: Do any of you live in Brooklyn?Kim: May, Brian and Dave do.L4LM: A lot of our fans have noticed a rise in the live music culture of Brooklyn. Can you speak to that at all?Brian: I think May’s more qualified because she actually gigs in Brooklyn. The Pimps only play about three or four shows a year there because we’ve graduated to a certain level. You have an experience with it.Mayteana: I was just talking about this with my husband the other day and we were talking about how, for a while—you can attest to this too—is that the live music scene was dying for a short time. And now I’m walking around and I see live music here, live music there. It’s kind of resurging a bit, which is really nice to see because it was like, “What is happening to this culture?” It was kind of disappearing. These great music venues are shutting down with high rents or whatever. And now, so, me and my man, we play these restaurants and we’re playing 1920s, 30s music. So people are connecting to some rootsy music. I think there is the desire for live music and for music that’s not only popular, but all kinds of music. I think it’s an important part of the city. But there’s always a venue—Rockwood, for instance, Lower East Side—there’s always something interesting to see, so I think you just have to find different pockets. I don’t know. I think it’s always, it’s ever changing and the styles are ever changing, you know? There’s modern, there’s old, there’s people that are going to music school, there’s crazy…I don’t know if you know Cory Henry, Funk Apostles and Snarky Puppy, that school, that are playing some crazy new shit. It’s interesting. I think there is an evolution.L4LM: That seems to be the case with live music in general. Last year was a banner year in the business. It’s harder to make money just by recording music so you have to go out and play. Have you guys experienced that first-hand?Brian: Oh yeah. You can barely make anything making albums anymore. But the one thing there’s always going to be a value for is live music. So think as music just becomes so available, and I think in some ways people fall in love with albums less than they used to because it used to be, you got the vinyl or the tape and you just look at the picture on it and put this in. Where now, it’s just like, “Oh, what do I want to listen to now?” You can access anything. Maybe that means less and maybe that has some type of effect on making live music.L4LM: Along those lines, where do you guys fall as far as streaming is concerned? I was listening to you guys through Spotify…Brian: Yeah, Spotify is a real problem for artists. It’s a problem that they need to figure out. It’s not fair for artists. It’s incredibly…it’s not really moral. I use Spotify too, but they just need to figure out a way that they are not taking advantage of artists, that they can compensate the artists. Making records is really expensive and time consuming and it’s like your life’s work and then people just…the company…I think you saw the thing that was going around on Facebook. You need to get like, what, 200 million plays to equal the average salary. They just need to figure something out.Mayteana: And I think, at this point, they have like membership fees that will cover a little bit more for artists.Brian: Or you get 10 plays and then you have to buy the record or something like that.Kim: Something. There’s got to be a way. And the thing is, artists will start getting fed up enough that they have to find a way. I understand on the other side, the consumer side. We all use it, I’m sure, Spotify. It’s great to have the access, but we’re also, this is our living. We’ve put so much into it.L4LM: Well thanks so much for talking to us!Note: Parts of this interview were edited for clarity and length. Photo taken by Stuart Levine at BottleRock.last_img read more

Leftover Salmon Announces Lineup For Their SolShine Festival

first_imgColorado’s own Leftover Salmon has announced details with their annual SolShine Music Festival, which is set to take place in Winter Park, CO from August 11th-14th. The festival will feature four sets from Leftover Salmon – two sets each on August 12th and 13th – while the rest of the lineup rounds itself out nicely with sets from Trout Steak Revival, The Record Company, Gipsy Moon, DeadPhish Orchestra and Sweet Lillies.Erik Deutsch, Greg Garrison and Alwyn Robinson will play a special late-night set one night, while DeadPhish Orchestra will kick things off on August 11th. The event will be held in Hideaway Park, and is a free, while ticketed shows will be held at Ullrs and Winter Park Pub. For more information and details, check out the Winter Park website.last_img

Warren Haynes Shares Playlist Of His Favorite Jerry Garcia Songs [Listen]

first_imgGuitarist Warren Haynes continues to honor the music of the Grateful Dead with his Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebrations, performing Garcia’s music not only with orchestras, but also with his own guitar, Wolf. With the exciting announcement yesterday that Melvin Seals, a longtime member of the JGB, would join Haynes for an upcoming Symphonic Celebration on Garcia’s birthday at Red Rocks, fans could not be more excited for these upcoming shows.To get his fans in a Grateful mood, Haynes shared a playlist chock full of his favorite Garcia songs. Check out the playlist, and read his thoughts on each and every track below, courtesy of the Warren Haynes website.Warren Haynes’ Favorite Grateful Dead SongsTERRAPIN STATION – The quintessential Grateful Dead “time capsule” song. CHINA DOLL – I much prefer “live” versions to the studio version. Beautiful haunting melody and lyrics. CRAZY FINGERS – I love the way the music and melody, which sound nothing like traditional reggae music, are superimposed over the reggae beat. Great chord changes. COMES A TIME – I always loved the Garcia/Hunter ballads. Gave Jerry plenty of space to emote in. His voice really delivers the emotion of the lyric and melody. BROKEDOWN PALACE – Another beautiful ballad with a timeless lyric and music that spans back through the history of American music. SHAKEDOWN STREET – I prefer the slower, funkier “live” versions to the studio version but it’s a classic part of the Dead repertoire. UNCLE JOHN’S BAND – One of Hunter’s best lyrics – really paints a picture of a beautiful, fictitious story. HELP ON THE WAY > SLIPKNOT – Classic 1, 2 punch – fans hate to hear them separated, but either on it’s own is great. Cool juxtaposition of a straight ahead, R&B influenced, tune in to a very complex instrumental that’s influenced by jazz and classical music. RIPPLE – The simplest, but perfect, melody – also one of Hunter’s best lyrics. The audience has to sing along-they have no choice. BLUES FOR ALLAH – Uniquely beautiful piece of music. KING SOLOMON’S MARBLES – Another complex instrumental very influenced by jazz and jazz fusion. STELLA BLUE – Another timeless ballad composed in a way that shows influences from decades before the birth of Rock and Roll. WHARF RAT – One of those “slow-burn” Dead tunes that signifies their unique, instantly identifiable sound. Great song but also a great vehicle for improvisation. SCARLET BEGONIAS > FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN – Another pair of classics that the audience loves to hear together, but are equally powerful apart.last_img read more

Umphrey’s Brings The Shady Horns To Boston For An Epic Throwdown [Videos/Gallery/Setlist]

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee returned to the Blue Hills Bank Pavilion in Boston last night, and they brought The Shady Horns with them for a jam-packed show filled with lots of fun improvisation.The band kicked things off with a huge four-song movement, starting off with 2013 UMBowl instrumental “Gents”, before moving into old favorite “White Mans Moccasins”, followed up by a raging “Ringo”, before they landed on a high-energy “Miss Tinkles Overture”. Next up, Umphrey’s performed their multi-part fan-favorite “2×2”, featuring an incredible guitar solo from recent birthday boy Brendan Bayliss. The band then invited out featured guests Eric “Benny” Bloom and Ryan Zoidis, who brought the thunder with huge versions of “Speak Up”, “Headphones & Snowcones”, and “Example 1” to end set one with a serious bang.After a short break, Umphrey’s returned to the stage for a wild version of “Dump City”. The song is always well-received by fans, and delivered it’s usual healthy dose of improv – truly an excellent way to open up set two. “Cemetary Walk 1” followed, with Umphrey’s crushing the piano-driven, prog-rock song. The dancey “Day Nurse” followed, which eventually winded its way into a perfect version of their classic “Divisions”. After the huge “Divisions”, Umphrey’s picked the energy up even more with their metal rager “Wizard Burial Ground”. After the head-banging of “WBG”, the band invited The Shady Horns back out for a funky version of “I Got Love” before closing things out with the relative rarity of “Woman Wine & Song”.The band took their customary encore break, then returned to the stage for a pulsating version of “Bad Friday”, bringing the horns back out for one more high energy moment before bringing the evening to a close.Thanks to these Umphreaks, we can enjoy some fan-shot footage from the Boston takeover:Speak Up w/ The Shady Horns [via Kyle Miller] You can also stream the full audio from the show, courtesy of taper opsopcopolis, below:Umphrey’s McGee is at The Peach Music Festival next, playing an “After Midnight” set this evening. After such a hot show in Boston, one can only imagine the fireworks that fans will experience when they see a raging Umphrey’s late-night set at The Peach.Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee | Blue Hills Bank Pavilion | Boston, MA | 8/12/2016Set One: Gents > White Mans Moccasins > Ringo > Miss Tinkles Overture, 2×2, Speak Up, Headphones & Snowcones, Example 1Set Two: Dump City, Cemetary Walk 1, Day Nurse > Divisions, Wizard Burial Ground, I Got Love, Woman Wine & Song.Encore: Bad Friday[Photos by ATS Photography, see the full gallery below.] Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Widespread Panic Covers Black Sabbath For The Fourth Consecutive Show

first_imgOn Friday, it was “Fairies Wear Boots.” Saturday, “Sweet Leaf.” Sunday, “Children Of The Grave.” Last night, Widespread Panic continued their trend of covering a Black Sabbath tune in the encore, bringing out a wild debut version of “Electric Funeral” – in the middle of “Chilly Water” no less.Panic was on hand at the Orpheum Theatre in Minneapolis, MN, playing to an enthusiastic crowd on a fall tour run that will ultimately land them in Colorado for three nights. With all eyes on the Halloween run, Panic continues to serve up fiery dishes of Southern-fried jam rock. The band has yet to repeat any songs on this tour as well, continuing to mine their deep catalog over the course of these four nights.“Let’s Get Down To Business” opened the show, before the classic Pops Staples cover “Hope In A Hopeless World” came next. The band touted out classics like “Heroes” and “Old Neighborhood,” included a great “Party At Your Mama’s House > Stop Breakin’ Down Blues” and ended the first set with “Conrad.”The band got to jamming in the second half, with “Steven’s Cat” opening and great segues like “Time Zones > Solid Rock” and a “Machine” that would ultimately lead into “Little Kin,” “Travelin’ Light,” “Barstools & Dreamers,” a mini “Drums” jam,” “Red Hot Mama” and “Fishwater.” Of course, you know the ending by now, as Panic brought out “Chilly Water” and segued into their debut of “Electric Funeral,” before returning to “Chilly Water” to end the set.In honor of the debut Black Sabbath cover, listen to the first three Sabbath tunes that the band played in Milwaukee below (though the “Fairies Wear Boots” video is actually from Austin).Fairies Wear BootsSweet LeafChildren Of The GraveYou can see the full setlist below, courtesy of PanicStream.Setlist: Widespread Panic at the Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis, MN – 10/25/16Set 1 Let’s Get Down To Business, Hope In A Hopeless World, Heroes, Old Neighborhood, Makes Sense To Me, I’m Not Alone, Party At Your Mama’s House > Stop Breakin’ Down Blues, Conrad (60 mins)Set 2 Steven’s Cat, Wondering, Time Zones > Solid Rock, Machine > Little Kin > Travelin’ Light > Barstools & Dreamers > Mini-Drums > Fishwater > Red Hot Mama > Fishwater (80 mins)Encore Chilly Water > Electric Funeral > Chilly Water (16 mins)Notes [‘Electric Funeral’ first time played (Black Sabbath); 4th consecutive show featuring Black Sabbath in encore (Halloween theme?)]last_img read more

Watch All Three “A Very Jerry Christmas” Shows From Cris Jacobs [Full Videos]

first_imgCris Jacobs brought his A Very Jerry Christmas show back to Gypsy Sally’s last Wednesday before returning to the 8X10 in Baltimore for two sold out nights. He started this holiday celebration a few years ago and said, “it’s some of the most fun gigs of the year.”Jacobs, who has been riding a wave a success following the release of his new album, Dust to Gold, was joined by John Ginty on the organ, Mookie Siegel on keys, Dave Markowitz on bass, and Ed Hobugh on drums. You can catch Cris again with Everyone Orchestra for a two night new years run at Gypsy Sally’s on the 30th and 31st.Check out audio and videos from all three nights below:Gypsy Sally’s soundboard/mic audio mix:Gypsy Sally’s YouTube Live Recording:8X10 YouTube Live Recording, Night 1:8X10 Youtube Live Recording, Night 2:last_img read more

The Werks Drop First Official Release In Over A Year With New Live Album [Listen]

first_imgOhio-born jam band, The Werks just officially dropped their newest release, Live From The Werk Out 2016. The live album constitutes some of their best performances from their annual festival, The Werk Out, last year in Thornville, OH.After not dropping any official releases in over a year, Live From The Werk Out 2016 is an eight-track, two-hour sonic oasis for thirsty fans. The full album is available for download via the band’s Bandcamp using a “name your price” rate . A preview of the album is available via SoundCloud, which you can hear for yourself below!last_img

12-Year-Old Son Of Metallica’s Robert Trujillo Debuts With Korn For South American Tour [Videos]

first_imgKorn hit Bogotá, Colombia, last night, kicking off their South American tour with Tye Trujillo, the twelve-year-old son of Metallica’s Robert Trujillo. The little bass prodigy was tagged in to replace Korn’s long-standing bassist Reginald “Fieldy” Arvizu for the South American leg of the tour due to “unforeseen circumstances,” though Arvizu will rejoin the group for the North American leg of the Serenity of Suffering tour. Fans in Colombia did not seem to mind the debut of Arvizu’s replacement, however; Trujillo proved himself as a skilled musician despite his young age. You can watch videos of the younger Trujillo shredding with Korn below, all courtesy of Juan Sebastián Rodríguez Isáziga.last_img