Day: August 27, 2019

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first_img News | PET-MRI | May 23, 2019 Study Explores Magnetic Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agent for PET/MRI Researchers from Bourgogne University in Dijon, France, showed that use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (… read more News | November 09, 2008 NOPR Update: PET’s Impact Consistent Across Cancer Types, Imaging Indications News | Radiation Therapy | May 31, 2019 RefleXion Opens New Manufacturing Facility for Biology-guided Radiotherapy Platform RefleXion Medical recently announced the opening of its new manufacturing facility at its headquarters in Hayward,… read more X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center. News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | July 01, 2019 Bracco Imaging Acquires Blue Earth Diagnostics Bracco Imaging S.p.A. has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Blue Earth Diagnostics, a molecular imaging company… read more News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019 International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for… read more News | PET-CT | August 15, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Installation of uExplorer Total-body PET/CT United Imaging announced that its uExplorer total-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system… read more News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 17, 2019 New Phase 2B Trial Exploring Target-Specific Myocardial Ischemia Imaging Agent Biopharmaceutical company CellPoint plans to begin patient recruitment for its Phase 2b cardiovascular imaging study in… read more Image courtesy of MR Solutions.center_img Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers. Related Content News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | June 05, 2019 BGN Technologies Introduces Novel Medical Imaging Radioisotope Production Method BGN Technologies, the technology transfer company of Ben-Gurion University (BGU), introduced a novel method for… read more News | PET-CT | June 19, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Install of uMI 550 Digital PET/CT United Imaging announced the first U.S. clinical installation of the uMI 550 Digital positron emission tomography/… read more News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019 Amsterdam University Medical Center Wins MR Solutions’ Image of the Year Award The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular… read more November 10, 2008 – Results from the National Oncologic PET Registry (NOPR) indicate that information provided by positron emission tomography (PET) was found to affect how clinicians manage their cancer patients’ care regardless of the cancer type and reason for ordering this imaging scan.The results were published online Nov. 7 in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.Earlier this year, the study authors reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology aggregate data contributed to the NOPR during year one of operation that demonstrated clinicians changed the intended care of more than one in three cancer patients as the result of PET scan findings. After two years of operation, with nearly twice the data for analysis, the authors found the impact of PET to be very consistent for a wide range of cancers and indications.Researchers analyzed data for 40,863 PET studies performed at 1,368 facilities participating in the NOPR nationwide during the registry’s first two years of operation. The impact of PET was assessed for 18 cancer types in patients with pathologically confirmed cancer and for indication for testing that included initial cancer staging (14,365 scans), restaging (14,584 scans) or detection of suspected cancer recurrence (11,914 scans).“For the purposes of guiding clinical practice and shaping coverage policy, it is important to determine the relative effects of PET for different cancer types and indications for testing,” said Bruce Hillner, M.D., lead author for the study and professor and eminent university scholar in the Department of Internal Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University. “These results strongly indicate the utility of PET for managing cancer patient care across a broad spectrum of cancer types and imaging indications.”The NOPR was launched in May 2006 in response to the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) novel “Coverage with Evidence” policy to collect data through a clinical registry to inform the center’s FDG-PET coverage determination decisions for currently non-covered cancer indications. The project is sponsored by the Academy of Molecular Imaging (AMI) and managed by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the ACR Imaging Network (ACRIN). For more information: www.cancerPETregistry.org, http://jnm.snmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/jnumed.108.056713v1. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 13, 2019 Blue Earth Diagnostics Expands Access to Axumin in Europe Blue Earth Diagnostics announced expanded access to the Axumin (fluciclovine (18F)) imaging agent in Europe. The first… read morelast_img read more

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first_imgJuly 6, 2010 – C. R. Bard Inc. announced today that it has completed its acquisition of SenoRx Inc., a manufacturer of breast cancer treatment devices. Under the terms of the merger agreement, SenoRx stockholders will receive $11 in cash for each share held of SenoRx common stock, a premium of approximately 14 percent over the closing price of SenoRx shares on May 4, 2010, the last trading day before the public announcement of the acquisition.With the closing of the transaction, trading in SenoRx common shares was suspended. SenoRx common shares ceased to trade on NASDAQ at market close July 6 and were delisted.SenoRx develops, manufactures and sells minimally invasive medical devices used by breast care specialists for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, including its EnCor vacuum-assisted breast biopsy system and Contura MLB catheter for delivering radiation to the tissue surrounding the lumpectomy cavity following surgery for breast cancer. SenoRx’s field sales organization serves over 2,000 breast diagnostic and treatment centers in the United States. In addition, SenoRx sells several of its products through distribution partners in more than 30 countries outside the U.S. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD News | Proton Therapy | August 06, 2019 IBA Signs Contract to Install Proton Therapy Center in Kansas IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A.) recently signed a contract and received the first payment for a Proteus One solution… read more Related Content The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Radiation Oncology | July 31, 2019 Laura Dawson, M.D., FASTRO, Chosen as ASTRO President-elect The members of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) elected four new officers to ASTRO’s Board of… read more Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 02, 2019 Varian Showcases Cancer Care Systems and Software at AAPM 2019 Varian showcased systems and software from its cancer care portfolio, including the Identify Guidance System, at the… read more News | July 06, 2010 C. R. Bard Acquires Breast Cancer Device Company last_img read more

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first_img Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Feature | November 23, 2011 | Jeanne-Marie Phillips, president, HealthFlash Marketing Communications 2012: What’s Ahead A panel of industry leaders talks about what they expect for the coming year. News | Radiology Imaging | July 22, 2019 AHRA and Canon Medical Systems Support the 12th Annual Putting Patients First Program For the past twelve years, Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc. has partnered with read more The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, read more Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Advances in long-length digital radiography are creating opportunities for visualization during spinal surgery, as well as pre- and post-operatively. Image courtesy of Fujifilm Medical Systems Feature | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Imaging Market in U.S. Could Rise In Coming Years The coming years may be good for the medical imaging community in the United States. But they will not be easy. read more Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough discusses bridging diversity gaps in medical physicsPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:05Loaded: 2.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.center_img Videos | AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McColl… read more Feature | Radiology Business | July 23, 2019 | Greg Freiherr Liars in Radiology Beware! Can you tell when someone is lying? read more Related Content Demand for ultrasound scans at U.S. outpatient centers could grow by double digits over the next five years, according to a speaker at AHRA 2019. A variety of factors, however, could cause projections for this and other modalities to change. Graphic courtesy of Pixabay A 3-D printed model (left) and a model constructed in augmented reality (right), both of a kidney with a tumor. In both models, the kidney is clear; the tumor is visible in purple on the AR model and in white on the 3-D printed model. Photo courtesy of Nicole Wake, Ph.D. Body language expert Traci Brown spoke at the AHRA 2019 meeting on how to identify when a person is not being honest by their body language. She said medical imaging department administrators can use this knowledge to help in hiring decisions and managing staff.  Video Player is loading.Sudhen Desai explains how deep learning might assist pediatric imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:21Loaded: 1.95%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:21 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. As the year draws to a close, ITN asked a few industry veterans to share their views about current issues shaping medical imaging today and what they foresee for the industry in 2012. Following are their responses to our Q&A.Q: From the perspective of your particular market segment, what is your outlook or expectation for the coming year in terms of technology developments or trends?Robert Cooke, independent business leader in medical imaging: The three trends I foresee for 2012 are massive computing, cloud computing and consumerism.“Watson,” the IBM super computer that dominated a Jeopardy match earlier this year, is learning medicine and even has a “job” with a major insurance company. For a computer, it’s a short jump from pop- culture to medicine.Advances in delivery of Web content and bandwidth will create the means to deliver meaningful functionality and collaboration across a variety of platforms.People want to be involved in their healthcare; people want to see their test results. The public is also now concerned about the potential impact of radiation exposure.Steve Deaton, VP of sales, Viztek: We expect to see the cost of film cause more facilities to abandon analog imaging and convert to a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) environment.  From a financial perspective, we expect to discover many more digital replacement opportunities in 2012.  Facilities with computed radiography/digital radiography (CR/DR) or PACS systems that are more than three years old can definitely realize improved workflow by replacing their equipment — although many CFOs would argue that financially, it does not make sense to repurchase something that is functional.  Anne LeGrand, VP and general manager of X-ray division, GE Healthcare: I see three prominent trends in X-ray technology — the ongoing conversion from analog to digital; the push for easy-to-use, patient-friendly and cost-effective equipment and body composition analysis advances will continue through 2012.As a first-touch modality for many patients seeking care, X-ray is becoming more compact, mobile and precise. In fact, the use of digital imaging is transforming X-ray to become a more specific investigational filter used prior to other diagnostic procedures and lifestyle interventions.Diana L. Nole (MBA), president, digital medical solutions, Carestream Health: Use of mobile devices for image viewing is a new development that promises to speed treatment and enhance patient care. Zero-footprint enterprise image viewers are an integral ingredient in this new mobile workflow because they enable rapid data access without the time or expense of downloading and maintaining software applications on dozens of workstations. Independent viewers are preferred, since they can be integrated with other vendors’ PACS systems, DICOM archives or XDS repositories. If viewers can be embedded in a health information system (HIS) or electronic medical record (EMR) portal, authorized users can view patient data and images with a single login.    Henri “Rik” Primo, director of marketing and strategic relationships, SYNGO Americas, Siemens Healthcare: As aging baby boomers dramatically increase the demand for healthcare services, the focus will be on demonstrable treatment efficacy and cost-cutting. Vast amounts of healthcare data useful in addressing these issues already exist. The focus will be on creating cross-departmental IT systems that can analyze this information and use it to create effective and efficient models for disease management, as well as applications that will help caregivers monitor and manage patient care every step of the way.Other applications, for instance those that can measure quality, will monitor physician performance in detail. It will also be necessary to facilitate cross-enterprise information exchange, which can help reduce redundancies in administrative and diagnostic cycles.Q: What are your expectations about the governmental or regulatory pressures to come? Cooke: Meaningful use incentives sought to improve coordination of care, yet healthcare largely runs on a fee-per-service model. This does not foster coordination.  We can expect to see initiatives seeking to integrate diagnostic services around specific disease states. Integrating care settings, imaging, tissue and blood analysis into a single pathway has the potential to improve this coordination of care.A big challenge will be navigating the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) processes. We have technologies and approaches in imaging that are becoming increasingly complex, and the approval pathways haven’t kept up.Deaton: Government pressures should hurt small PACS companies’ competitiveness, because it will require more interfacing between imaging departments and information systems.  Small companies simply do not have the programming manpower to keep up with the interfacing, and we expect small vendors to struggle to compete.LeGrand: The regulatory process will continue to play an important role in the healthcare industry. As regulatory processes vary in complexity and length of time from country to country, it is important that we have the appropriate technology on a global basis. As a global provider of healthcare equipment, it is imperative we remain current, aligned and responsive to the changing healthcare environment.Nole: Meaningful use is driving the need for flexible radiology information system (RIS) platforms that allow workflows to be quickly and easily adapted to meet new government regulations. Our RIS already meets the first phase of meaningful use requirements. We have applied for certification and are expecting it to be finalized by RSNA. In addition, both our RIS and PACS platforms share data with EMR systems to assist healthcare facilities in meeting meaningful use requirements.Primo: Accountability is becoming the watchword in healthcare today. A challenge for healthcare IT will be to support healthcare institutions and individual professionals in meeting and measuring performance benchmarks and also in determining ways to increase collaboration among institutions.To enable this data sharing with respect to imaging, I think we will see a greater reliance on the cross-enterprise document sharing for imaging (XDS-1.b) integration profile as defined in the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) profile. This profile is a standards-based specification for managing the sharing of imaging objects among healthcare enterprises. My belief is that nearly every PACS request for proposal (RFP) in the next two years in the United States will include some specification of XDS functionality.Q: What are your thoughts about business and workflow challenges in the next 12 months?Cooke: As the government seeks to control costs, imaging exams have the potential to be performed across a variety of care settings.As reimbursement and dose concerns take center stage, more point-of-care oriented imaging exams will be performed. Low-cost, no-dose procedures such as ultrasound also create the potential to head off higher cost, more complex, dose-intensive procedures.  The challenge will be to integrate and structure all of this information from diverse care settings into a single view physicians can use to help make the appropriate decision.Deaton: There is a history of extremely high service contract pricing from manufacturers. These service/maintenance prices will decrease drastically in 2012.  We are seeing medium-sized PACS vendors replace large PACS vendors at large hospitals for the cost of a few years of what the large vendor would charge for ongoing service/maintenance.  Medium-sized PACS companies such as Viztek are catching up and often surpassing the big brand names in terms of functionality and are willing to offer very low service costs to help close a large PACS sale. Facilities can realize 18-month return on investments (ROIs)  for replacing existing equipment, based on service and upgrade contract pricing alone.  LeGrand: As access to healthcare and cost pressures increase globally, healthcare facilities are seeking ways to do more with less. It will continue to be important to offer solutions and tools that help improve the productivity and effectiveness of healthcare providers.Advanced technology, such as digital X-ray, mobile X-ray and workflow solutions, can help hospitals realize accurate diagnostic outcomes, improve patient safety and save considerable time and resources.Nole: It has always been challenging to image critically ill or injured patients who cannot be moved and are surrounded by medical equipment. Carestream worked directly with customers to develop a new DR mobile X-ray imaging system.  Primo: Not only will we be doing more with less money, but it also stands to reason we will be asked to do more with fewer medical professionals because our population of physicians and nurses is also aging. IT can automate the communications and overall case management workflow, helping healthcare professionals work faster and smarter.Also, imaging departments and imaging centers will have to work harder at documenting the need for diagnostic exams, and they will need to integrate this documentation step into their traditional workflows. They will also have to forge alliances with complementary providers and build their new referral networks.  Establishing communication networks will enable this growth and also help streamline care.Q: What is your outlook for the imaging industry as a whole in the coming year?Cooke: Established IT vendors and technologies will be challenged by the potential to deliver the same services using cloud technologies.Adoption of certain modalities may slow, given utilization management pressures, and focus will shift to extract more quantitative information from these devices. However, the introduction of these more complex imaging technologies may be slower in the face of the existing FDA approval pathways.Decision-support tools to help automate the imaging process will also begin to take center stage. Initially, these tools will be based on published standards. But increasingly, these standards will be based on a more personalized approach driven by patient history and evidence.Vendors will need to think outside of the traditional procedure model and start to think in terms of disease management to prepare for the future.Deaton: 2012 will be a booming year specifically for digital X-ray. Growth in this product segment will be propelled by the rapidly decreasing price of DR panels. DR has no mechanical parts to fail and will soon be at current CR price points.  CR price-points can reduce somewhat, but costs for manufacturing and assembling are much higher than solid-state DR panels. So it will be hard for CR price-points to drop enough to maintain a hold on the market. We expect DR sales to surpass CR sales in 2012.Currently in 2011, Viztek has sold more than 250 DR panels and will end the year with an equal number of CR and DR sales. CR has historically outsold DR in quantity, but this will flip-flop in 2012.LeGrand: The imaging industry in 2012 will continue to focus on technology that can help reduce cost, improve quality and increase access to healthcare globally. We will need this ongoing focus as we develop technology “in country for country” to meet the unique needs of healthcare providers around the world. In X-ray, this will mean developing affordable technology that can deliver quality-of-care and continuing to facilitate the concept of mobile and “point-of-care” solutions.Nole: Independent research firms report the overall demand for imaging services continues to grow. Since budgets are tight, healthcare providers are scrutinizing the value of every purchase. DR systems that can integrate with existing X-ray room or mobile-based systems offer significant cost advantages, while delivering rapid image access and excellent image quality.The ability to use a DR detector in multiple systems also offers an exceptional return on investment. As an example, the same detector can be used in mobile systems for early morning exams and then placed in an X-ray room for general radiology exams.Primo: The outlook for both imaging and imaging IT is strong. The aging population alone increases the need for quality diagnosis and healthcare. Imaging exams and technology will have to become more affordable, and technology trends are already supporting this.What we will see is even greater reliance on imaging in both the context of pre-treatment planning and then in post-treatment followup. As the use increases, we will see proliferation of image management systems in these departments — leading to even more specialty-specific applications.IDNs will archive all imaging studies generated by imaging systems in various hospitals and sub-specialty departments in a consolidated, standards-based enterprise archive (VNA). The archive could provide hyperlinks with metadata to the IDN’s EMR, so that images can be accessed and called up by the EMR users in the Enterprise without having the EMR store all of these images. It is obvious that IT will be instrumental in supporting the information flow that leads to smarter ways for providing the cost-efficient healthcare the Baby Boomer generation will need. itnJeanne-Marie Phillips is president of HealthFlash Marketing Communications, a public relations firm specializing in healthcare. Contact: jphillips@healthflashmarketing.com (link sends e-mail), 203.977.5555, healthflashmarketing.com.The PanelistsRobert Cooke, independent business leader in medical imaging, Redding, Conn.Steve Deaton, VP of sales, Viztek, Garner, N.C.Anne LeGrand, VP and general manager of X-ray division, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, U.K.Diana L. Nole, MBA, president, digital medical solutions, Carestream Health, Rochester, N.Y.Henri “Rik” Primo, director of marketing and strategic relationships, SYNGO Americas, Siemens Healthcare, Malvern, Penn. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Feature | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 19, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr DR Advances Promote Imaging of Whole Spine Recent advances in… read more Feature | Advanced Visualization | July 02, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis Augmented Reality Versus 3-D Printing for Radiology Three-dimensional (3-D) printing and… read morelast_img read more

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first_imgKey Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 2.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Related Content News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019 Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021 August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative read more News | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | August 01, 2019 DrChrono Teams With DeepScribe to Automate Medical Note Taking in EHR DrChrono Inc. and DeepScribe announced a partnership so medical practices using DrChrono EHR can use artificial… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more News | PET-CT | August 15, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Installation of uExplorer Total-body PET/CT United Imaging announced that its uExplorer total-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system… read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | August 02, 2019 ASRT Supports Radiopharmaceutical Reimbursement Bill The American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) announced its support for House Resolution (HR) 3772, a measure… read more July 31, 2012 — MIM Software Inc. has announced the latest release of its MIMneuro software. Version 5.5 includes three new enhancements that make it particularly suited for quantitative analysis of amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) images.Traditionally the variability in uptake patterns with targeted tracers such as amyloid PET agents have confounded single template registration approaches. The MIM BrainAlign deformable registration algorithm includes the ability to deformably register to multiple templates simultaneously. With this landmark-based deformable registration approach, local differences in anatomy can be resolved more accurately than with affine registration or other deformable registration approaches.MIM Software has also worked with experts in the field to define and release a third anatomical brain atlas. This probabilistic amyloid atlas is a tool specifically tuned for performing quantitative regional analysis on amyloid PET images. A database of healthy controls has also been integrated for statistical analysis of amyloid PET images.MIMneuro 5.5 combines these three new features with existing tools for statistical comparisons — including voxel-based analysis, region-based analysis, standardized uptake value (SUV) computation, cluster analysis and surface projection analysis — into a comprehensive quantitative functional neuroimaging software.For more information: www.mimsoftware.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more Technology | July 31, 2012 MIM Software Releases MIMneuro 5.5 Featuring Quantitative Analysis of Amyloid Images last_img read more

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first_imgTechnology | August 07, 2012 Fujifilm Introduces Flexible DR Room Offering Latest features improve workflow at the patient’s bedside and enhance versatility News | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 23, 2019 Konica Minolta and Shimadzu to Co-market Dynamic Digital Radiography in the U.S. Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. along with Shimadzu Medical Systems USA announced a collaborative agreement to… read more Related Content Advances in long-length digital radiography are creating opportunities for visualization during spinal surgery, as well as pre- and post-operatively. Image courtesy of Fujifilm Medical Systems Feature | Information Technology | June 27, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Smart Algorithm Extracts Data from Radiology Reports Radiology reports may contain information essential to figuring out a patient’s condition. read more Video Player is loading.Sudhen Desai explains how deep learning might assist pediatric imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:21Loaded: 1.95%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:21 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Feature | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 19, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr DR Advances Promote Imaging of Whole Spine Recent advances in… read more August 7, 2012 — Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. announced the latest addition to its family of digital radiography (DR) products, the FDR D-EVO Suite II, a cost-effective, flexible, DR-room solution designed to optimize workflow while utilizing any of Fujifilm’s FDR D-EVO portable detectors.The FDR D-EVO Suite II is designed with busy technologists and their patients in mind, while providing Fujifilm’s high image quality. It comes equipped with new automation and display features on the tube head. The new tube head includes a convenient touch screen for system adjustments traditionally found at the generator console.“One of the highlights of this new system is having these controls at the tube head,” says Rob Fabrizio, senior marketing and product development manager, digital radiography systems, Fujifilm. “This allows the technologist to stay with the patient at the table while making simple exam adjustments. Then, the tech can simply return to the control area to take the exposure.”The system’s workflow enhancements also provide benefits in areas where speed during the exam is critical. Fabrizio adds, “The new system is perfect for everyday use to high-volume, high-stress emergency departments. It provides just the right balance of automation and manual movements for day in and day out reliability and time critical grab and go speed.”Any of Fujifilm’s FDR D-EVO detectors, including the 17×17 model, can be used interchangeably with the FDR D-EVO Suite II to maximize flexibility. By providing access to the 17×17 detector, the new system offers a full field of view that was traditionally only available with high-end, fixed detector systems. The lightweight wireless FDR D-EVO panels can further maximize ROI by allowing clinicians to mix, match and share sizes and capture-types throughout the radiology department, including other rooms and portables.The release of the FDR D-EVO Suite II comes on the heels of the company’s recent No. 1 ranking as the highest score overall for medical equipment vendor in the “2012 Best in KLAS Awards: Medical Equipment & Infrastructure” report.For more information: www.fujimed.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Videos | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medica read more center_img Technology | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Shimadzu Medical Systems USA, a subsidiary of Shimadzu Corp., announced they have received U.S. Food and Drug… read more Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Walkaround AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:25Loaded: 11.42%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:25 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | Digital Radiography (DR) | June 28, 2019 Springfield Clinic Deploys 17 Carestream Digital X-ray Systems Springfield Clinic implemented 14 Carestream DRX-Evolu read more Technology | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 25, 2019 Samsung Announces New iQuia Premium Digital Radiography Platform Samsung has announced iQuia, a new digital radiography (DR) platform of premium products and technologies that improves… read more Videos | Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, read more News | Radiation Dose Management | July 18, 2019 Low Doses of Radiation Promote Cancer-capable Cells Low doses of radiation equivalent to three computed tomography (CT) scans, which are considered safe, give cancer-… read more News | Radiology Business | June 26, 2019 Konica Minolta Healthcare and the Emory Healthcare Innovation Hub Partner to Drive Innovation in Healthcare Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas, Inc. read morelast_img read more

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first_img News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019 Konica Minolta Healthcare Partners With DiA Imaging Analysis for AI-based Cardiac Ultrasound Analysis DiA Imaging Analysis has partnered with Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. to expand analysis capabilities of… read more Related Content News | Clinical Decision Support | July 18, 2019 Johns Hopkins Named Qualified Provider-led Entity to Develop Criteria for Diagnostic Imaging On June 30, 2019, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced the Johns Hopkins University School… read more Technology | Mammography Reporting Software | June 12, 2019 Three Palm Software Releases WorkstationOne Version 1.8.8 Three Palm Software announced the release of the 1.8.8 version of its breast imaging workstation, WorkstationOne. This… read more News | PACS Accessories | May 28, 2019 Intelerad Showcases Clario SmartWorklist at SIIM 2019 The Clario SmartWorklist intelligently manages picture archiving and communication system (PACS) reading workflow by… read more read more News | Digital Pathology | July 16, 2019 Paige Announces Clinical-grade Artificial Intelligence in Pathology July 16, 2019 — Computational pathology… read more October 14, 2013 — Digisonics Inc. introduced functionality for appropriate use criteria (AUC) calculations. Digisonics recognizes that reimbursement audits will be tied to appropriate use scores in the future, benefitting facilities that utilize the Digisonics CVIS (cardiovascular imaging and information systems) to monitor appropriate use scores and produce the required structured reports.Digisonics CVIS, with appropriate use criteria calculations, help facilities prepare for the future of healthcare and ensure the quality of patient care by providing clinicians with evidence-based guidelines to make the best clinical decisions.Digisonics provides image management and structured reporting systems for CVIS, radiology and obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN). Its reporting solutions combine image review workstations, a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) image archive, an integrated clinical database, analysis capabilities and configurable reporting for multiple modalities. Key applications are complemented with interfaces to information systems and third party vendors.For more information: www.digisonics.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Ultrasound Women’s Health | July 11, 2019 FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more News | PACS Accessories | June 13, 2019 M*Modal and Community Health Network Partner on AI-powered Clinical Documentation M*Modal announced that the company and Community Health Network (CHNw) are collaborating to transform the patient-… read more Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 2.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | PACS | June 07, 2019 PaxeraHealth Wins Four New PACS Projects in Chile Picture archiving and communication system/radiology information system (PACS/RIS) developer PaxeraHealth has won four… read more Technology | October 14, 2013 Digisonics Introduces Appropriate Use Criteria Calculations for Cardiovascular PACS last_img read more

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first_img Related Content Organizations on the path to compliance:Organized radiation safety committee that conducts regular standards reviewsOpen communication with clinical staff regarding radiation safety best practicesDevelopment of a dynamic radiation safety programDefined radiation safety incidents and incident management policies and proceduresExploration of technical solutions to monitor and capture patient radiation dose February 6, 2014 — The topic of radiation safety and radiation dose monitoring has moved from state-specific regulations to a national trend with The Joint Commission’s (TJCs) recent announcement of their “New and Revised Diagnostic Imaging Standards.” The call for dose management and tracking has graduated from being advised to being mandated — from both a legal perspective and from within the world of healthcare’s patient safety foundation. The question that many organizations find themselves asking is “Where does this leave me?” and “Are we prepared for compliance?” News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Feature | February 06, 2014 | Neomi Mullens, Acendian Healthcare Consulting Joint Commission Releases Imaging Standards The answer and call to action came in December 2013 when TJC released their “New and Revised Diagnostic Imaging Standards.” The announcement of TJCs revised imaging standards blankets all TJC accredited hospitals, critical access hospitals and ambulatory health care organizations that provide diagnostic imaging services effective July 1, 2014, with additional requirements to be phased in by 2015. The only question that remains is, “Are you prepared for the integration of and compliance with these new standards?” Organizations not prepared for compliance with TJC standards:Lack of organizational radiation safety committee and regular radiation safety meetingsRadiology exams being performed by unregistered and uncertified technologistsInability to track patient radiation dose history or exam history within patient recordsOutdated and sub-standard CT protocol useNo policies or procedures regarding radiation dose tracking or incident management Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Mahadevappa Mahesh discusses trends in medical physics at the 2019 AAPM meetingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:01Loaded: 4.04%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Organizations prepared to comply with and embrace new radiation standards:Implementation of a robust and dynamic radiation safety programEngaged radiation safety committee and physicist who regulate radiation safety practices and initiatives on a regular basisAnnual performance evaluations of imaging equipment by a medical physicistRegistration and certification of all radiology technologistsUpdated protocols for all imaging procedures including the pediatric populationMethod for collecting and storing patient dose data within the patient’s clinical recordCollection of data on incidents where pre-identified radiation dose limits have been exceeded Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more The race to implement reform and effective solutions around radiation dose safety was brought to the forefront when some states took a very progressive initial stance regarding patient safety and quality by creating control measures to govern certain radiology procedures that utilize radiation dose as part of an exam. By creating legislation that mandated the monitoring of radiation dose and reporting of any radiation dose incidents, states such as California and Texas left healthcare providers with no option but to comply with new laws and enhance their radiation safety initiatives. But being compliant does not always equate to a clinically proficient, ”patient first” radiation safety program. Videos | AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting … read morecenter_img Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Video Player is loading.Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Following the legal reforms, numerous hospitals and healthcare organizations outside of these states quickly embraced the call for radiation dose safety changes by beginning to build more robust radiation safety programs and re-evaluating internal radiation safety practices. Many of these organizations are top tier healthcare providers who are often looked to for setting standards and trends within the healthcare industry. The restructuring of their radiation safety initiatives included enhancing current practices around computed tomography (CT) protocol reviews, the development of incident management policies and procedures, procurement of new technologies and software to track and monitor radiation dose and the revision of general workflows and daily practices for performing radiology exams. Several entities have adopted radiation safety initiatives such as these in an effort to become compliant according to their own organizational standards and goals. With these self-initiated efforts underway, many organizations are ahead of the game, but where will the standardization among efforts come into play? Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more In assessing your organization’s preparedness to efficiently and effectively comply with the upcoming standards and regulations, it may be helpful to understand where you stand in forming internal radiation safety policies and whether you are on the path to success or need to drive initiatives harder in order to deliver responsible healthcare. Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more With new radiation management spreading throughout the industry, the expectation and demand for optimized radiation safety practices will drive healthcare organizations to implement new methodologies and programs to keep up with highly competitive industry-wide initiatives. Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Editor’s note: This article is from the AHRA (Association for Medical Imaging Management) newsletter. Neomi Mullens is a project manager at Ascendian Healthcare Consulting, and a frequent and published contributor to the subject of enterprise dose management and tracking. For more information:  www.ascendian.com, ahraonline.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s.last_img read more

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first_img News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more Image courtesy of ViztekFebruary 2, 2015 — Viztek announced 20 percent year-over-year increase in software sales for the 2013-2014 calendar year. As physicians today are competing with hospital systems for the purchase of walk-in urgent care clinics, and forming multi-specialty clinics, Viztek was able to successfully capitalize on this trend with its RIS and PACS solutions. Additionally, the expansion of the Viztek DR product line, with the introduction of the ViZion + wireless DR panel and the rapid adoption of the Viztek U-Arm and straight-arm bolstered DR sales up 25 percent over the previous year.Introduced in late 2013, Viztek’s Exa PACS gained FDA-approval in 2014. The completely web-based technology is compatible with all devices and operating systems providing efficiency and productivity to hospitals, imaging centers and teleradiology groups via unprecedented PACS accessibility and utility for end users.In late 2014, Viztek announced that it was the first company to proactively license and provide true zero footprint viewing for radiologists and referring physicians. Not only can radiologists view reports regardless of the operating system or the age of the computer, Viztek has also added server-side rendering for the added speed of download.Also instrumental to the company’s 2014 growth was the introduction of the ViZion + wireless DR panel. The new DR panel delivers a cost-effective option for the urgent care, orthopedic and hospital settings. Viztek’s new U-Arm DR and Overhead Tube Crane (OTC) systems were unveiled for the first time in late 2014. Both systems were designed to maximize ease-of-use and versatility and will support the company’s continued DR market growth in 2015.For more information: www.viztek.net FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related Content News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019 Konica Minolta Healthcare Partners With DiA Imaging Analysis for AI-based Cardiac Ultrasound Analysis DiA Imaging Analysis has partnered with Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. to expand analysis capabilities of… read more News | PACS | July 02, 2019 Laurel Bridge and 3M M*Modal Partner to Improve DICOM Structured Reporting July 2, 2019 — Laurel Bridge Software announced an expanded relationship with 3M M*Modal, a provider of clinical docu read more News | PACS | June 26, 2019 Mini-PACS Solution for Image Management and Workflow Optimization ImageGrid Mini is a feature-rich, reliable and cost-effective image management and workflow optimization solution, pr read more Technology | Enterprise Imaging | July 05, 2019 Hyland Healthcare Adds ImageNext Imaging Workflow Optimizer to Enterprise Imaging Suite Hyland Healthcare is launching ImageNext, a vendor-neutral imaging workflow optimizer that combines intelligent imaging… read more Feature | Information Technology | June 27, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Smart Algorithm Extracts Data from Radiology Reports Radiology reports may contain information essential to figuring out a patient’s condition. read more News | Enterprise Imaging | July 29, 2019 Philips Announces 10-year Enterprise Informatics Agreement With Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Nancy Philips and Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) de Nancy, a leading academic hospital in the Grand Est… read more News | Enterprise Imaging | June 27, 2019 Ambra Health Announces Integration With Box Ambra Health announced an integration with Box to enable the sharing of medical imaging directly from within Box’s… read more News | February 02, 2015 Viztek Sees 20 Percent Year-Over-Year Growth in PACS/RIS/EHR Installs Expanded DR portfolio with addition of wireless DR panel and increased software sales boosts growth and bottom linelast_img read more

How Radiology Can Stay Strong in Valuedriven MedicineHow Radiology Can Stay Strong in Valuedriven Medicine

first_img Feature | Information Technology | June 27, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Smart Algorithm Extracts Data from Radiology Reports Radiology reports may contain information essential to figuring out a patient’s condition. read more Videos | Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, read more News | Radiology Business | June 26, 2019 Konica Minolta Healthcare and the Emory Healthcare Innovation Hub Partner to Drive Innovation in Healthcare Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas, Inc. read more Feature | Radiology Imaging | October 13, 2015 | Greg Freiherr How Radiology Can Stay Strong in Value-driven Medicine News | Digital Radiography (DR) | June 12, 2019 Utah Valley Hospital Purchases Nine Carestream Imaging Systems Utah Valley Hospital (Provo, Utah) has installed nine Carestream imaging systems that equip its radiology staff to… read more Technology | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Shimadzu Medical Systems USA, a subsidiary of Shimadzu Corp., announced they have received U.S. Food and Drug… read more Video Player is loading.Sudhen Desai explains how deep learning might assist pediatric imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:21Loaded: 1.95%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:21 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | Radiation Dose Management | July 18, 2019 Low Doses of Radiation Promote Cancer-capable Cells Low doses of radiation equivalent to three computed tomography (CT) scans, which are considered safe, give cancer-… read more Related Content News | Artificial Intelligence | June 03, 2019 SIIM and ACR Host Machine Learning Challenge for Pneumothorax Detection and Localization The Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) are collaborating… read more Full body scans taken with GE Lunar’s iDXA machine: radiograph (left); bone density (center); fat density (right). Images courtesy GE HealthcareTwenty years ago whole body scanners were a fad. It wasn’t called that. But it had the earmarks. Wild enthusiasm. Widespread adoption.Now their makers are trying to return to those glory days. These scanners became popular in the mid-1990s by providing dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to assess osteoporosis. GE Lunar and Hologic now are promoting DXA scanners for a different purpose — to determine body composition through scans that detail the relationship between fat, bone and lean tissue.Developing more uses to augment old ones has been a tried and proven way to increase the value of an established technology. The applications need not be “new” in the truest sense. DXA as a means to assess body composition is nothing new.1 But it’s hard to imagine a better time than now to build on this capability.   In the United States, obesity is at near epidemic levels. DXA offers a precise and well-accepted way to gauge body mass. Its scan might potentially spur a patient to make lifestyle changes, as well serve as a baseline for improvement. Applying DXA as a weapon to fight obesity opens the door to virgin turf — health spas. But established grounds remain viable, even preferred. Traditionally DXA scanners have been installed in hospitals, outpatient imaging clinics and group practices. With radiologists at the controls, DXA may be useful not just in combating obesity, but in tracking the progress made by an athlete in training or recovering from an injury. In a broader patient population, body composition analyses may spot patients at risk for diabetes. This data may even be collected and analyzed from multiple, geographically diverse locations, leading to insights that go beyond the health of individual patients.And DXA represents just one opportunity. Another is aging or, more exactly, antiaging.Devolving into the modern equal of snake oil salesmen is not the intent. No therapy can reverse or even slow aging. But the diagnosis of age-related illnesses and injury can be part of preventive medicine. That is, in fact, how DXA first took hold. Several means for gauging bone fragility — DXA among them — were available in the ‘80s and early ‘90s. None gained traction until an effective treatment for osteoporosis surfaced in 1995. Today we are seeing a similar opportunity.With life expectancies for the current generation likely to eclipse 120, patients in their 70s and 80s will want to do what the current generation is doing in its 40s and 50s. Radiologists are positioned to help. Anatomical imaging is being complemented increasingly by capabilities that reveal physiological processes. Molecular imaging is one; functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) another; dual-energy computed tomography (CT) a third.Radiology needs to apply these capabilities in unconventional ways. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans for Alzheimer’s disease exemplify how molecular imaging might promote radiology’s role in a campaign against aging. More such opportunities need to be capitalized upon. The increasing automation of imaging, development of smart data analytics and widespread adoption of teleradiology threaten to turn radiology into a commodity. Keeping this from happening will depend on developing services and insights that only someone with a radiologist’s unique training and knowledge could do. In this way, radiologists can prove their value in a medical landscape being reshaped by value-driven medicine.  Additional readings:1. Mei Z, Grummer-Strawn LM, Pietrobelli A, et al. “Validity of body mass index compared with other body-composition screening indexes for the assessment of body fatness in children and adolescents.” Am J Clin Nutr 2002;75:978–85Greg Freiherr has reported on developments in radiology since 1983. He runs the consulting service, The Freiherr Group. Read more of his views on his blog at www.itnonline.com. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Walkaround AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:25Loaded: 11.42%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:25 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Technology | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 25, 2019 Samsung Announces New iQuia Premium Digital Radiography Platform Samsung has announced iQuia, a new digital radiography (DR) platform of premium products and technologies that improves… read more Videos | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medica read more News | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 23, 2019 Konica Minolta and Shimadzu to Co-market Dynamic Digital Radiography in the U.S. Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. along with Shimadzu Medical Systems USA announced a collaborative agreement to… read more last_img read more

Eizo Releases 6Megapixel Multimodality Medical MonitorEizo Releases 6Megapixel Multimodality Medical Monitor

first_img Technology | Flat Panel Displays | November 28, 2018 LG Unveils New Diagnostic Monitor, Digital X-ray Detectors at RSNA 2018 LG Electronics is expanding its U.S. medical imaging portfolio with a new high-performance 21-inch diagnostic monitor… read more News | Flat Panel Displays | June 18, 2019 Double Black Imaging Announces Expanded Display Line and Ergonomic Workstation Solutions Double Black Imaging (DBI) and their Image Systems Division are releasing their new clinical and diagnostic display… read more LG Medical MonitorsLeveraging years of industry-leading expertise in flat-panel display technology, LG Business Solutions has expanded their medical imaging device portfolio of the most accurate displays possible.SharePlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 4:57Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -4:57 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsdefault, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Technology | Flat Panel Displays | December 06, 2018 USEI Introduces Windows-Based iPad Medical Imaging Viewing Solution at RSNA 2018 U.S. Electronics Inc. (USEI) recently announced the release of what it calls the world’s first Windows-compatible… read more The DBI CL8MPS from Double Black Imaging Photo courtesy of US Electronics Feature | Flat Panel Displays | April 18, 2018 | Melinda Taschetta-Millane Flat Panel Display Market Outlook The global flat panel display market is predicted to reach $177.3 million by 2027, according to a new report titled “… read more Technology | Flat Panel Displays | May 17, 2019 Tru-Vu Monitors Releases New Medical-Grade Touch Screen Display Tru-Vu Monitors released the new MMZBTP-21.5G-X 21.5” medical-grade touch screen monitor. It is certified to both UL… read more November 16, 2016 — Eizo Inc. announced the release of the RadiForce RX660, a 30-inch, 6-megapixel monitor ideal for multimodality applications. It is the successor model to the RadiForce RX650 and features new functionality for improving reading room efficiency.The new monitor is equipped with Eizo’s original space and time saving function called Work-and-Flow, which is included with the bundled RadiCS LE software. Work-and-Flow allows radiologists to easily show or hide a PinP (Picture in Picture) window, allowing them to view two separate video inputs within a single monitor. This can eliminate a monitor that is viewed infrequently — such as examination lists — and is easily operated by moving the cursor to the corner of the monitor.Additionally with Work-and-Flow, USB switching is done within the monitor so users can work on multiple PCs using only one mouse and keyboard. Users simply move the cursor across the screens to quickly start working on another PC. With these two functions, Work-and-Flow provides quick and easy information referencing and a barrier-free workstyle.Compared to its predecessor, the RadiForce RX660 hosts a slimmer, more compact housing for a more efficient workspace. The monitor’s width and depth have been reduced by 9.5 mm and 56.5 mm, respectively. In addition, the size of the power supply was greatly reduced and now comes built into the monitor. This results in a monitor that takes up 23 percent less space, giving radiologists more room for other tasks. It is also 6 kg lighter than the previous model for ease of installation.The monitor is equipped with DisplayPort 1.2 input and output terminals, which means that 6-megapixel resolution can be achieved using a single cable. The output terminal can then be used to attach additional monitors in a daisy chain sequence, removing the hassle of excess cables.The 6 megapixel screen provides ample space for displaying numerous applications at once, making it an effective replacement for a dual 3-megapixel monitor setup. Healthcare professionals can conveniently view images side-by-side without the obtrusive bezels typically found in a multi-monitor environment.The RadiForce RX660 comes equipped with Eizo’s Sharpness Recovery technology that restores sharpness typically lost due to the high brightness requirements of medical monitors. This ensures the screen displays images with a level of clarity that is true to the source data.Eizo will demonstrate the RadiForce RX660 at the 102nd Radiological Society of North America annual meeting (RSNA 2016), Nov. 27-Dec. 1 in Chicago.The RadiForce RX660 will begin shipping in late June 2017.For more information: www.eizo.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related Contentcenter_img Sponsored Content | Videos | Flat Panel Displays | December 25, 2018 VIDEO: 50 Years of Innovative Visual Technology EIZO, which means image in Japanese, is a visual technology company that develops and manufactures high-end display s read more Technology | Flat Panel Displays | March 30, 2018 Canvys Introduces New 27- and 32-inch 4K Ultra HD Displays Canvys, a Division of Richardson Electronics Ltd., recently enhanced its 4K Ultra HD custom display series of high-… read more 50 Years of Innovative Visual TechnologyEIZO, which means image in Japanese, is a visual technology company that develops and manufactures high-end display solutions. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:53Loaded: 2.82%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:53 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Sponsored Content | Videos | Flat Panel Displays | September 26, 2018 LG Medical Monitors Leveraging years of industry-leading expertise in flat-panel display technology, LG Business Solutions has expanded t read more News | Flat Panel Displays | November 16, 2016 Eizo Releases 6-Megapixel Multimodality Medical Monitor Slimmer monitor offers greater workflow and workspace efficiency in reading rooms News | Oncology Diagnostics | February 06, 2019 Oxford University Hospitals Employs Barco Synergi for Multi-disciplinary Cancer Conferences Oxford University Hospitals (OUH) is trialing clinical collaboration technology from Barco for its Multi-disciplinary… read more Feature | Flat Panel Displays | April 11, 2019 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane Flat Panels to Help Enhance and Streamline Workflow The flat panel display market shows signs of maturing, however many new applications are available that can help to s read more Photo courtesy of Barcolast_img read more

MRI May Help Predict Cognitive Impairment in Professional FightersMRI May Help Predict Cognitive Impairment in Professional Fighters

first_img Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. Fighters are exposed to repeated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), which has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders, as well as mood and movement dysfunction. A tool that could find signs, or biomarkers, of mTBI-related brain damage would be an invaluable asset in helping fighters and their physicians understand their risk of cognitive impairment while potentially speeding interventions and contributing to the study and development of drugs designed to slow or reverse cognitive decline.Much of previous research on the subject has focused on either the brain’s neuron-containing gray matter or the fiber tracts in the white matter. For this new study, researchers combined two MRI techniques — T1-weighted MRI and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) derived from diffusion weighted MRI — to look at both types of brain tissue.“DTI is specific to the white matter part of the brain and T1-weighted images are sensitive to the gray matter,” said study lead author Virendra Mishra, Ph.D., from the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas. “By combining these approaches, we hoped to find imaging biomarkers on MRI that could be used to predict whether or not fighters will become impaired.”The researchers used data from the Professional Fighters Brain Health Study, one of the largest longitudinal studies of brain health in contact sports. Data included 273 male fighters who had baseline imaging exams and 56 who returned for a follow-up scan. Using neuropsychological testing, measures from processing speed and psychomotor speed were used to differentiate fighters into cognitively impaired and non-impaired groups, as cognition cannot be seen as a singular entity, Dr. Mishra noted. All fighters underwent T1-weighted MRI and DTI.The study revealed a set of seven imaging predictors, including regions of gray matter and white matter, which were associated with cognitive function in fighters. For instance, T1-weighted volumetric measurements of the left thalamus, a mass of gray matter in the middle of the brain that acts as a relay center connecting a multitude of brain regions, helped distinguish cognitively impaired and non-impaired fighters. Fractional anisotropy values, a measure of white matter integrity, along two different white matter tracts were also identified as possible predictors of cognitive impairment. The researchers concluded that this set of seven brain regions comprising of both gray and white matter may become imaging biomarkers of cognitive impairment in fighters.“We found lower gray matter volume and thickness measures along with lower white matter tract integrity at baseline measurements that declined over time in those with ongoing trauma, and only by looking at both were we able to predict which fighters would be cognitively impaired,” Mishra said. “The combined observation of both gray and white matter as useful predictors of cognitive impairment is understandable because these two types of brain tissue work in tandem.”The MRI approach using different modalities may have several applications, Mishra said. For one, it could be used to help predict later cognitive change in fighters. Another key potential application is to track change in clinical trials of novel therapeutics aimed at reducing the risk of cognitive impairment.The approach also may have applications in studying the impact of other contact sports where head injuries often occur, such as football and hockey.In the future, the researchers hope to determine the order in which brain regions are affected by repeated trauma.“One of the key questions we’re trying to answer is, what’s affected first, the neurons in the gray matter or the fiber tracts in the white matter?” Mishra said. “We don’t have the answer yet, but it’s something we are working on.”For more information: www.rsna.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 02, 2017 MRI May Help Predict Cognitive Impairment in Professional Fighters Images of the brain’s gray and white matter obtained with multiple MRI techniques can help identify and track cognitive impairment in active professional fighters, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more Image courtesy of Imago Systemscenter_img News | Stroke | August 16, 2019 Mobile Stroke Unit Gets Patients Quicker Treatment Than Traditional Ambulance Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute…. read more Image courtesy of UTHealth McGovern Medical School News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more Related Content News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more Technology | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Shimadzu Medical Systems USA, a subsidiary of Shimadzu Corp., announced they have received U.S. Food and Drug… read morelast_img read more

Portable 3D Scanner Assesses Patients with ElephantiasisPortable 3D Scanner Assesses Patients with Elephantiasis

first_img Feature | Advanced Visualization | July 02, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis Augmented Reality Versus 3-D Printing for Radiology Three-dimensional (3-D) printing and… read more A portable scanning device produces a 3-D reconstruction of swollen legs caused by lymphatic filariasis, a disease that infects millions globally. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and colleagues in Sri Lanka will use the device to collect limb measurements for a clinical research trial examining whether the antibiotic doxycycline can reduce the severity of swelling. Image courtesy of Michael J. Weiler/LymphaTechOctober 26, 2017 — Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, working with collaborators in Sri Lanka, have shown that a portable scanning device can measure limb enlargement and disfigurement faster and more easily in patients with elephantiasis. The research tool makes it easy to obtain accurate measurements and determine whether treatments to reduce swelling are effective.An estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, known as elephantiasis. Healthcare workers rely on leg measurements to assess the severity of the condition. However, measuring legs that are severely swollen often proves cumbersome and impractical.“This is important because it will allow doctors and researchers to take very accurate limb measurements in developing nations, where there are often limited tools to monitor swollen limbs,” said senior author Philip J. Budge, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Washington University.In patients with elephantiasis, the parasitic worms that cause the disease make their way into the lymphatic system and prevent the lymph vessels from working properly, which leads to swollen legs. This condition also is referred to as lymphedema.“Unfortunately, the medication does not usually reverse lymphedema in those already affected,” Budge said. “The ability to get these measurements rapidly will make it much easier to treat patients, including those in clinical trials exploring better treatment therapies.”The device is essentially an infrared sensor, mounted on an iPad, that produces a highly accurate, virtual 3-D reconstruction of the legs using scanning technology similar to that found in Microsoft’s Xbox Kinect video game system. It was created by Atlanta-based startup LymphaTech to measure lymphedema that sometimes develops in cancer patients after lymph nodes are removed during surgery.After learning about the technology, Washington University researchers Budge and Ramakrishna Rao, Ph.D., an associate professor of medicine, teamed up with international partners to test the device on 52 patients with varying stages of lymphedema at a clinic in Galle, Sri Lanka. Working with physicians at the clinic, the team compared scanner results with results from two other techniques frequently used to ascertain the severity of elephantiasis: use of a tape measure, and water displacement.Tape measures allow researchers to measure limb circumference near the knees, feet and ankles. However, Budge said, the method can be difficult to standardize and unreliable in assessing leg volume because of bumpy, uneven skin surfaces caused by the swelling.The water displacement procedure entails patients submerging a leg in a water tank and then measuring how much water is displaced. Each leg is done separately. “This is the gold standard for measuring limb volume, but it is cumbersome and impractical to use in field studies,” Budge said. “Some patients have lymphedema so severe, they have difficulty getting a leg into the water tank or standing still long enough for all the water to drain out. Or they may have open wounds that complicate the process.”The study showed that the infrared scanner provided measurements of leg volume and of limb circumference at multiple points that were just as accurate and precise as those obtained by tape measure and water displacement.“But the most encouraging news is that the scanner produced highly accurate results in only a fraction of the time of the other tests,” Budge said.Researchers found that the average time required for scanner measurements of both legs was 2.2 minutes. In comparison, the tape measure and water displacement methods took an average of 7.5 minutes and 17.4 minutes, respectively.“The scanning tool also offers convenience,” Budge said. “Many patients with swollen limbs often have great difficulty traveling from their homes to the clinic to have their measurements taken. The scanner should make it possible to take extremely accurate limb measurements in the patients’ homes or villages, without cumbersome equipment or inconveniencing patients.“To our knowledge, this is the first time that infrared 3-D scanning technology has been used in patients with filarial lymphedema,” he added. “It worked so well that it has been added as a measurement tool in a future clinical trial in which we are collaborating.”That study is a two-year, multisite, international clinical trial to determine whether the antibiotic doxycycline can reduce the severity of swelling and disfigurement in patients with lymphatic filariasis. Enrollment for Washington University’s partner site in Sri Lanka is scheduled to start this fall.The study is published online Oct. 16 in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.For more information: www.ajtmh.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more Feature | Molecular Imaging | July 01, 2019 | By Sharvari Rale Transformations in Molecular Imaging Herald Entry to Novel Applications Diagnostic procedures have always been a cornerstone of early prognosis and patient triaging. read more Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 20, 2019 TeraRecon Receives First-of-Kind FDA Determination for Northstar AI Results Explorer Advanced visualization and artificial intelligence (AI) technology provider TeraRecon has successfully completed a U.S… read more News | Medical 3-D Printing | August 08, 2019 RSNA and ACR to Collaborate on Landmark Medical 3D Printing Registry The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) will launch a new medical… read more Technology | Advanced Visualization | June 13, 2019 Materialise Receives FDA Clearance for Cardiovascular Planning Software Suite Three-dimensional (3-D) printing software and solutions company Materialise has received U.S. Food and Drug… read more A 3-D printed model (left) and a model constructed in augmented reality (right), both of a kidney with a tumor. In both models, the kidney is clear; the tumor is visible in purple on the AR model and in white on the 3-D printed model. Photo courtesy of Nicole Wake, Ph.D. News | Advanced Visualization | July 03, 2019 TeraRecon Unveils iNtuition AI Data Extractor Artificial Intelligence (AI) and advanced visualization company TeraRecon announced its new iNtuition AI Data Extractor… read more Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 11, 2019 Aidoc Earns FDA Approval for AI for C-spine Fractures Radiology artificial intelligence (AI) provider Aidoc announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared… read more Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare Related Content News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 12, 2019 Konica Minolta Healthcare Announces Autologous Biologics Workshop in Partnership With EmCyte Corp. Konica Minolta Healthcare announced a new autologous biologics workshop in partnership with EmCyte Corp. The workshop… read more News | Orthopedic Imaging | October 26, 2017 Portable 3-D Scanner Assesses Patients with Elephantiasis Device measures swollen limbs faster, more easily than other methods Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 10, 2019 Medivis SurgicalAR Gets FDA Clearance Medivis announced that its augmented reality (AR) technology platform for surgical applications, SurgicalAR, has… read morelast_img read more

NTT DATA Partners With Pieces Technologies on Artificial IntelligenceNTT DATA Partners With Pieces Technologies on Artificial Intelligence

first_img The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | January 23, 2018 NTT DATA Partners With Pieces Technologies on Artificial Intelligence New partnership with Pieces Technology helps clients improve the quality and decrease the cost of patient care with artificial intelligence  News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019 Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021 August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 January 23, 2018 – NTT DATA Services announced it has partnered with Pieces Technologies for clinical artificial intelligence (AI), to help clients improve the quality and decrease the cost of patient care with natural language and AI-based solutions.NTT DATA Services will integrate the Pieces Decision Sciences (DS) software into its comprehensive portfolio that includes data integration services, analytics capabilities, cloud services and transformation consulting. The expanded services will enhance clients’ ability to meet the triple aim of healthcare: improving the quality of patient care and overall population health while lowering costs.The cloud-based Pieces DS platform applies advanced technologies, including natural language processing (NLP), to power key algorithms throughout the patient’s journey in real time. Fully integrated with electronic medical records, the software leverages predictive modeling, clinical NLP, machine learning and AI directly at the point of care to aid real-time decision making. This enables hospitals and health systems to lower readmissions and avoidable hospitalizations, reduce excess length of stay, minimize the risk of healthcare-associated infections, and decrease complications from sepsis and inpatient deterioration.Since 2016, the Pieces DS software has proven to identify at-risk patients and prevent healthcare-associated infections for Pieces clients, according to the company, resulting in:Up to 20 percent reduction in length of stay;Up to 26 percent reduction in readmissions; andUp to 15 percent reduction in sepsis mortality                                                                                                                         For more information: www.nttdataservices.com News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Related Contentcenter_img News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | Breast Imaging | August 02, 2019 Volpara to Distribute Screenpoint Medical’s Transpara AI Solution Volpara Solutions and ScreenPoint Medical BV signed an agreement under which Volpara will sell ScreenPoint’s Transpara… read more Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more last_img read more